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R > R2E  > MICRAL-N


 

This mini forum is intended to provide a simple means of discussion about the R2E  MICRAL-N computer. If you want to share your own experience or memories, or add relevant information about this system: post a message!

  Click Here to add a message in the forum

 

Friday 16th August 2019
technology history junky

nitpick: it is not fair description to call the 8008 "8-bit 4004".
the 4004 was very limited intel in-house design, and not much was left from this - i think the 4040 and there the dynasty ends/

the 8008 was built to CTC instruction set, same as datapoint 2200, which was a reasonably capable processor. (interesting tidbit is that CTC also asked TI to build one, not just intel. they came up with a chip, and had samples, but very few people ever saw one, let alone a working circuit with one).
its weaknesses were the straight jacket of 18-pin package, and only 14 address bits, so only 16K.
the 8080 added a lot more than just the 40-pin package and 16 address lines, but it''s hard to argue that those were the main difference.

it is fair to say that the 8008 was closer to the 8080 which started the revolution than to the 4004/ i believe the instruction set of the 8008 is the foundation of the 8080, which was the foundation of the 8086, and all the way to the intel engine which still runs the world to this day.


Tuesday 7th November 2017
Ed Sharpe (az)
SMECC COMMUNICATIONS AND COMPUTATION MUSEUM

Later in life when Bull owned them there was a z-80 with either just floppy or floppy and hard drive... I have a catalog of an outfit surplussing a group of them in USA called DEALIN'' ELECTRONICS in Palo Alto. Date?
Ed Sharpe archivist for SMECC


Monday 22nd August 2016
David Lowry

I am a teenager and i like old computers!


Tuesday 20th January 2015
Dr. Darrel VanDyke (U.S.A.)

I am writing a book about the 1970''s computer era, and find Mr. Beckmann''s information quite helpful. I have some questions about the company finally went out of business - could he describe what happened to things like support of the system, how it was programmed, and how Bull got in the picture?


Thursday 24th August 2006
beckmann (Plouhinec (29) France)

35 years later am happy to read this page of history on Micral, an important event in my life which I'll never forget. Thanks to François Gernelle, an ignored genius. To precise things, Truong Trong Ti already was the R2E's president when story began in 72's but, as stated, never brought anything to the Micral. Only François and his team did it. I was'nt in charge of mechanical as written but developed all I/O boards and magnetic storage peripherals controllers. Lacombe designed memories, I/O high speed channel, power supply and the key front panel. Other technicians then participated to other Micral versions, like the S, G and M (multi-processor). Unfortunately, when Bull acquired the company under Truong's benediction, better than developing it and make Micral THE microcomputer of the world, prefering to abdicate to Microsoft, they killed R2E and the golden eggs chicken. That's the french way to develop computer technology... All Bull's acquisitions died years after. In France, there's no longer companies involved into computer technology, thanks to Bull. Jean-Claude Beckmann





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