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Welcome to old-computers.com, the most popular website for old computers.
Have a trip down memory lane re-discovering your old computer, console or software you used to have.

There are actually 1253 systems in the museum.


SHOW ME A RANDOM SYSTEM !

   LATEST ADDITIONS
TERAK CORPORATION 8510 Data Processor
The Terak 8510 is a complete stand-alone micro-computer based on DEC's LSI-11 chipset (16-bit !), in other words, it si a PDP-11 compatible. It was one of the first high-end microcomputers and among the first desktop personal computers to offer a bitmap graphics display. It was capable of running a stripped version of UNIX version 6. It was the first personal machine on which the UCSD p-System was widely used. Various universities in the USA used it in the late 1970s through mid-1980s to teac...
TOSHIBA  Visicom 100
This beautiful but obscure Japanese system was released in january 1978. It's basically a clone of the RCA Studio gaming system, one of the first videogame console of all time (released in january 1977). Made by Toshiba, this beauty was also based on the RCA 1802 micro-processor, and its video counterpart, the CDP 1861. However the main difference with the Studio II is that the Visicom 100 offers colour display thanks additional hardware. Another nice difference, is that unlike the Studio ...
BIT CORPORATION  Dina 2-in1 / Bit 7200 / Chuang Zao Zhe 50
The Dina, also known in Taiwan as the Chuang Zao Zhe 50, is a video game console originally manufactured by Bit Corporation, later sold in the United States by Telegames as the Telegames Personal Arcade.It is a clone of both the ColecoVision and Sega SG-1000 consoles, with one cartridge slot for each platform, and came bundled with the game Meteoric Shower, which was built into the system. Telegames never advertised its compatibility with the SG-1000. The Dina's controllers are modeled after ...
OHIO SCIENTIFIC  Challenger
In 1977 computing industry is changing fast. Ohio Scientific Instruments who were making a lot of expansion boards for their 400 single-board computer, called "Superboard", realize that it would be nice to sell all this hardware, all assembled, in a single case, ready to plug and use. That's what is a Challenger computer, more a concept than a single system. Indeed under the name Challenger came different configurations based around the Superboard system: - Challenger 65-1k: 6502A CPU, ser...
WANG LABORATORIES Wang 2200
The Wang 2200 appeared in May 1973, and was Wang Laboratories' first minicomputer that could perform data processing in a common computer language: BASIC. It had a cathode ray tube (CRT) built-in its case and also an integrated computer-controlled cassette tape storage unit. 65,000 systems were shipped in its lifetime and it found wide use in small and medium-size businesses worldwide. There has been quite several diffent models of the 2200: - 2200A : first models released in 1973 - 2200B :...
MATTEL ELECTRONICS  Keyboard Component
Sometime before the failed Aquarius home computer scheme was hatched by Mattel, the Intellivision team had attempted to expand Intellivision into the growing home computer market by turning it into a full fledged computer dubbed as the "Intellivision Keyboard Component", much in the same way Coleco was soon to do with their Adam computer. The unit featured a built-in cassette tape drive for loading and saving data. The Keyboard Component would plug into the cartridge slot on the Intellivision...
RCA Fred 2
This Fred 2 computer is a prototype designed by Joseph Weisbecker, engineer at RCA. He already imagined several early computer designs before this Fred 2 model, such as the System 00 or the original Fred concept. Fred is rather a concept imagined by Joseph Weisbecker for educational computer able to play games. This concept emerged in several hardware versions through time. The first models could be dates as early as 1970 or 1971 ! Unlike the System 00 which used only small-scale digital T...
BANDAI Arcadia
The Bandai Arcadia, is the same system as the Emerson Arcadia 2001, but sold in Japan. Please see this entry for more detailed informations. The Arcadia 2001 clones includes : Advision Home Arcade (France), Bandai Arcadia (Japan), GiG Electronics Leonardo (Italy), Hanimex HMG-2650, Leisure-Dynamics Leisure-Vision, Intercord XL 2000 system, Eduscho / Tchibo Tele-Fever, etc... It...
BANDAI TV Jack 5000
The TV Jack 5000 from Bandai released in 1978 is one of the first cartridge based system from Japan. It's the equivalent of european and american systems like the Hanimex SD-050, Acetronic Color TV Game, Prinztronic Micro 5500, SHG Blackpoint, Binatone Cablestar, Radofin telesports, etc. There have been tons of systems like these. The TV Jack 5000, like all these systems, use cartridges based on General Instruments chipsets which offers different games on each chip. That's why all these sy...
OLIVETTI  A5
Olivetti introduced a mainframe about 1960 which was called ELEA, then in 1965 the Programma 101 - which was probably the world's first real desktop computer. Then a little later they introduced the Audiotronic range of "office computers". The first was the A770, which was replaced by the A7. The A5 was the desktop version. The Olivetti Audit 5 or A5 was largely an electro mechanical computer. It printed via a golf ball typewritter mechanism at the astonishing speed of 16 character per second...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
SHARP  X68000 Super / Super HD
The X68000 Super is the successor of the X68000 Expert II and X68000 Pro II. The Sharp X68000 Super and the Super HD had both the same co-processor, an Intel based AMD clone Banchu Cammago 4007. The system a SCSI Hard-disk interface instead of the SASI....
HEWLETT PACKARD  INTEGRAL PC
The HP Integral PC is a "portable" computer (luggable, more like it, since it weights more than 10 Kg) which works under HP-UX (Hewlett Packard UNIX variant). It has a plasma screen and a built-in printer (the world famous HP ThinkJet, 150 cps). The memory can be extended to 1.5 Mb with 256 Kb modules and up to 5.5 Mb with an external extension. The ROM contains the OS (HP-UX), HP windows (the GUI) and PAM (a kind of graphic shell). This computer had no great success since it was ver...
SHARP  MZ 80C
The MZ-80c is based on the MZ-80K, but offers some enhancements to match the professional market of that time. The price was improved too ;-) It was the first MZ-80 computer to be delivered assembled as opposed to first MZ-80k which were sold as kits. The RAM size is now of 48 KB. The keyboard which was so strange on the MZ-80K because of its matrix organisation, has now a more common layout with a large spacebar key. The numeric keypad is separated. Anothe...
BINATONE Colour TV Game MK 10 (model n° 01 / 4842)
This pong is one of the many Binatone systems. As its name indicates, it offers 10 games : 8 pong games (basket 1, basket 2, gridball, squash 1, squash 2, football, tennis, ice hockey) and 2 shooting games (target 1, target 2). It is the last Binatone pong marketed and the most evoluated one. Game selection is made through 10 individual push buttons. The two detachable controllers are composed of an analog joystick and a fire button. They can be stored in slide-in compartments located on both...
MOTOROLA  WDR-1-Bit Computer
This is a homemade and nicely built training computer, and probably one of the rare computers in the world based on the 1-bit (yes, one bit) Motorola MC14500 processor. This machine was conceived en sold in Germany by DATANorf Hard and Software in kit or ready-built forms. Originally, the MC-14500, also called Industrial Control Unit (ICU) was a CMOS processor designed for controlling simple industrial devices and making binary decisions based on successive single bit information. ...
KENBAK COMPUTER COMPANY Kenbak-1
The Kenbak-1 is considered by many to be the world's first "Personal Computer." The Computer History Museum granted it this designation when they were still located in Boston in 1986. More specifically, the machine represents the first commercially available Von Neumann (stored program) computing device intended and priced for personal use. John V. Blankenbaker designed the Kenbak-1 and marketed in the pages of Scientific American in 1971. The machine's name was taken from the middle of John...
DRAGON DATA LTD  Dragon 32
The DRAGON 32 enjoyed a pretty good success in Europe. Its ROM holds the Operating System and a version of the Microsoft Extended BASIC. One of its characteristics is partial compatibility with the Tandy TRS 80 Color Series. They can use same peripherals and some cartridges, but most ROM calls will fail on the other computer. However, the Dragon did have at least two advantages over the first TRS-80 Color computer: A typewriter-style keyboard that was somewhat...
SHARP  X68000 Expert II
The X68000 Pro is the successor of the X68000 Expert. It was launched in the same time than the X68000 Pro II and seems to have the same characteristics. However it has a new main board and the stereo scope port has been removed. A X68000 Expert II HD (for Hard-Disk) was also produced....
ATARI  520 / 1040 STf / STfm
The Atari 520 and 1040 STf were the direct successors of the Atari 260 ST and Atari 520 ST. In fact, they had the same technical characteristics except from built-in floppy drive (hence the f of STf). The 3.5" floppy disk drive has been integrated with the power supply into the computer. The early first versions of the Atari 520 STf had a RAM based Operating System (they have a 32 KB ROM), this ROM will be quiclky replaced by a 192 KB ROM which holds all...
HOBBIT Hobbit
Many Spectrum clones were designed and manufactured in the Soviet Union or Russia, among them Spektr 48, Moskva, Robik and Sprinter. Some of them greatly surpassed the features of the original Sinclair Spectrum. The Hobbit was one of the most famous Speccy clones. It was a quite powerful system, mainly used in education, and also known in some Western European countries. Like in many Eastern clones, the processor was a Russian v...

   LATEST COMMENTS
David Wheeldon
3/7/2021
ACORN COMPUTER  ABC 310
I recently had the opportunity to collect and own and large collection of BBC equipment which included a number of 2nd processors including a working 80286 Issue 0 board also a 30Mb acorn hard drive unit full of master 512 type files and applications

David Wheeldon
3/7/2021
ACORN COMPUTER  ABC 310
I recently had the opportunity to collect and own and large collection of BBC equipment which included a number of 2nd processors including a working 80286 Issue 0 board also a 30Mb acorn hard drive unit full of master 512 type files and applications

David Wheeldon
3/7/2021
ACORN COMPUTER  ABC 310
I recently had the opportunity to collect and own and large collection of BBC equipment which included a number of 2nd processors including a working 80286 Issue 0 board also a 30Mb acorn hard drive unit full of master 512 type files and applications

Stan Sieler
3/5/2021
ABS COMPUTER  ORB
"...it was one of the first, if not the first, multi-user user microprocessor systems". I had an Alpha Micro AM-100 in my living room in 1978. A multi-user system, it was based on the WD16 microprocessor chipset from Western Digital (clone of a PDP-11, IIRC). But ... wow, I''d love to have an Orb!

Frank Slaghuis
3/4/2021
DATAPOINT CORPORATION Datapoint 2200
My dad worked as technician for Datapoint in Germany from 1980 until 1998. He died in 2004. Last winter when I visited my mum I ve found an old 2200 (16k version), 6600 and 6640 in their basement. My plan is to "refurbish" them... Is anybody here who can give me technical advise if I have any questions? That would be great! $) (in return, i would provide nice photos of the computer''s inner workings) You can mail contact me by mail: effes@freenet.de

David Gibson
3/4/2021
NCR  Decision Mate V
In the early 1980’s, I was an administrator at SOITA at Miami University in Ohio. SOITA was a non-profit, technology service agency to 200 school districts in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. We started offering computer hardware and software discount purchasing to our member schools. We sold an average of about 3 million dollars worth of computer hardware (mostly Apple) annually in the 1980s. NCR, headquartered in Dayton, wanted to explore the school computer market. They contacted us and donated 10 Decision Mate 5 units so we could try them out. They also donated several machines to schools around Dayton. I remember doing a few activities on the machine (I took one home) but found it difficult to operate for someone that had no computer background. In the meantime, we purchased several Apple IIe’s and were able to utilize inexpensive but high quality educational software from the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) and AppleWorks. All of this software was on 5.25 floppy disks. AppleWorks was an easy to learn utility program that gave us word processing, database and spread sheet capabilities. So the easy to use Apple IIe became the machine of choice for our schools driven by high quality and easy to use software. MECC was also a non-profit like SOITA and gave SOITA generous duplication rights to their educational software under a licensing agreement. SOITA duplicated $ distributed tens of thousands of MECC 5.25 disks to our member schools. MECC developed new educational programs every year that kept their products (like Oregon Trail and Number Munchers) very popular. Unfortunately for NCR, they were late to the school computer marketplace. There was no easy way to use high quality educational software for their DM 5. Eventually for schools, NCR ran into the classic situation for their DM 5 “they couldn’t give them away.” IBM, Commodore, Radio Shack and Atari had small footprints in the educational computing marketplace at this time. Their platforms were mostly easy to use and some software did exist (some through MECC). Eventually, after a decade, IBM $ Microsoft became strong rivals to Apple (and the Macintosh Computer) in the school market. MECC dissolved as a state supported non-profit and became a private company. NCR ceased to show interest in the educational marketplace after this failed experience. Their manufacturing and headquarters in Dayton eventually shut down with the HQ moving to Atlanta. SOITA eventually was no longer able to sell discounted hardware or software through group purchasing (Apple and MECC eliminated their volume purchasing structures) and concentrated their activities on teacher training. I was disappointed after reviewing Steve Jobs’s autobiography that he did not give much (if any) credit to the educational community for the early success of Apple. Once children started learning computer skills on an Apple II or Mac computer at school, they took that knowledge home and drove home purchases to Apple. I am guessing our early computer experiences in Ohio were similar to others throughout the country. So, in my opinion, the education marketplace was primarily responsible for Apple’s success. The software drove the hardware purchasing. This story could have been rewritten for any computer platform (including NCR) had high quality, easy to use software been available.

David Gibson
3/4/2021
NCR  Decision Mate V
In the early 1980’s, I was an administrator at SOITA at Miami University in Ohio. SOITA was a non-profit, technology service agency to 200 school districts in Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky. We started offering computer hardware and software discount purchasing to our member schools. We sold an average of about 3 million dollars worth of computer hardware (mostly Apple) annually in the 1980s. NCR, headquartered in Dayton, wanted to explore the school computer market. They contacted us and donated 10 Decision Mate 5 units so we could try them out. They also donated several machines to schools around Dayton. I remember doing a few activities on the machine (I took one home) but found it difficult to operate for someone that had no computer background. In the meantime, we purchased several Apple IIe’s and were able to utilize inexpensive but high quality educational software from the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) and AppleWorks. All of this software was on 5.25 floppy disks. AppleWorks was an easy to learn utility program that gave us word processing, database and spread sheet capabilities. So the easy to use Apple IIe became the machine of choice for our schools driven by high quality and easy to use software. MECC was also a non-profit like SOITA and gave SOITA generous duplication rights to their educational software under a licensing agreement. SOITA duplicated $ distributed tens of thousands of MECC 5.25 disks to our member schools. MECC developed new educational programs every year that kept their products (like Oregon Trail and Number Munchers) very popular. Unfortunately for NCR, they were late to the school computer marketplace. There was no easy way to use high quality educational software for their DM 5. Eventually for schools, NCR ran into the classic situation for their DM 5 “they couldn’t give them away.” IBM, Commodore, Radio Shack and Atari had small footprints in the educational computing marketplace at this time. Their platforms were mostly easy to use and some software did exist (some through MECC). Eventually, after a decade, IBM $ Microsoft became strong rivals to Apple (and the Macintosh Computer) in the school market. MECC dissolved as a state supported non-profit and became a private company. NCR ceased to show interest in the educational marketplace after this failed experience. Their manufacturing and headquarters in Dayton eventually shut down with the HQ moving to Atlanta. SOITA eventually was no longer able to sell discounted hardware or software through group purchasing (Apple and MECC eliminated their volume purchasing structures) and concentrated their activities on teacher training. I was disappointed after reviewing Steve Jobs’s autobiography that he did not give much (if any) credit to the educational community for the early success of Apple. Once children started learning computer skills on an Apple II or Mac computer at school, they took that knowledge home and drove home purchases to Apple. I am guessing our early computer experiences in Ohio were similar to others throughout the country. So, in my opinion, the education marketplace was primarily responsible for Apple’s success. The software drove the hardware purchasing. This story could have been rewritten for any computer platform (including NCR) had high quality, easy to use software been available.


   LATEST SOFTWARE ADDITIONS
ARITHMETIC DRILL (MATH FUN & FUN WITH NUMBERS) (CAS-110)
Toshiba Visicom 100
Toshiba (publisher) - 1978
 game - educational game - mathematics
INSPIRATION (CAS-190)
Toshiba Visicom 100
Toshiba (publisher) - 1978
 game - biorhythm
GAMBLER I (BLACKJACK) (CAS-140)
Toshiba Visicom 100
Toshiba - 1978
 game - blackjack - card game - casino - gambling
SPORTS FAN (BASEBALL & SUMO WRESTLING) (CAS-130)
Toshiba Visicom 100
Toshiba - 1978
 game - baseball - duel - fighting - martial arts - sport - sumo
GAMBLER II (SLOT MACHINE AND DICE) (CAS-141)
Toshiba Visicom 100
Toshiba - 1978
 game - gambling
SPACE COMMAND (SPACE WAR) (CAS-160)
Toshiba Visicom 100
Toshiba - 1978
 game - shoot them up - space - war
GET YOUR GADGET
Comx
Junior - 1984
 game - 2d - helicopter - shoot them up
TV HOCKEY (4 PLAYERS)
Arcade
Amutronics - 1973
 game - ball and paddle - hockey - sport
BREAKTHROUGH (QQA-306)
Interact-Victors-Hectors model
Interact Electronics (publisher) - 1978
 game - ball and paddle - breakout
BOWLING
RCA Fred computers
RCA - 1971
 game - bowling - sport
DEDUCE
RCA Fred computers
RCA - 1971
 game - mind games
TIC-TAC-TOE
RCA Fred computers
RCA (developer) - 1971
 game - mind games - tic tac toe
ELEVATOR PANIC (#12)
Epoch Cassette Vision
Epoch (publisher) - 1984
 game - elevator - platform
BASEBALL (#2)
Epoch Cassette Vision
Epoch (publisher) - 1981
 game - baseball - sport
DEFENDER
Arcade
Williams (publisher) - 1981
 game - horizontal scrolling - space

   RANDOM ADVERTS
French advert (1983)

THOMSON
TO 7

 
Promotional leaflet

THOMSON
TO 7 / 70

 
Disk drive #1 Jan. 1...

TANDY RADIO SHACK
Color Computer

 
French ad (jan. 1980...

TANDY RADIO SHACK
TRS 80 MODEL I

 
Japanese ad

CASIO
FP 1000 / FP 1100

 
US advert from Prote...

INTERACT
Home Computer System

 
US advert, August 19...

ATT
PC 6300

 
Brochure cover

SHARP
PC-5000

 
Diagrams

TESLA
PMI-80

 
Advert #1

SINCLAIR
ZX 80

 
German advert

OLIVETTI
M20

 
French advert (jan. ...

PHILIPS
Videopac C52

 
French advert.

ORIC
TELESTRAT

 
U.K. ad. (1986)

ATARI
520 / 1040 STf / STfm

 
Advertising picture

ACORN COMPUTER
Risc PC

 
1977 advert #2

SOUTH WEST TECHNICAL PRODUCTS CORPORATION
6800

 
US advert (1987)

TANDY RADIO SHACK
1400 LT/FD/HD

 
US advert, September...

OLIVETTI
M24

 
US advert, Oct. 1981

APPLE
APPLE II+

 
36 Mhz. in 1982?

INDEPENDANT BUSINESS SYSTEMS
BetaSystem

 
German ad #3

SHARP
MZ 700

 
Stupid situation

SINCLAIR
ZX 80

 
Printers advert

TANDY RADIO SHACK
Color Computer

 
French ad (jan. 1980...

AI ELECTRONICS
ABC 20

 
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