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E > ELECTRONICA > CIP-03   


ELECTRONICA  Electronica
CIP-03

Few information about this computer, a Romanian Sinclair ZX-Spectrum clone made from 1988 by Electronica CIE and sold only in Romania in blue or red case colour version. In fact, the colors only differed on the keyboard marquee, the case color being the same. On the red version the background of the keys is darker than on the blue version.

The CIP-03 had a built-in Spectrum compatible BASIC interpreter in ROM. But instead of the original Sinclair copyright text at boot, it shows simply a "BASIC S" string on the center of the bottom line on the screen.

The computer had no joystick interface built in, it could been however purchased separately (in contrast, other romanian Spectrum clones had built-in joystick port.) The keyboard had switches instead of the membrane of the original ZX Spectrum. Though it had a clumsy feeling while typing, it did not wear out easily. The computer had an internal speaker of about 0.5 watts which gave a very loud noise while loading programs, and there were no way to control the volume...

Apparently the CIP-03 is the most common of all Romanian ZX Spectrum clones.

There was another version called CIP-02 which had only 2 KB ROM containing a copy utility program. The advantage was that the RAM available for copying was 60 KB, more than enough for copying a full 48k program.

The BASIC interpreter was available on cassette tape and needed to be loaded each time the computer was powered on (but not reseted as the 0-16 KB area was protected from interrupts).

__________

Contributors: Szász Eduárd István (info)

Calin Popescu, the designer of the CIP-03 sent us this line:
I was the engineer who led the entire process - from design to manufacture - of this Spectrum clone at Electronica Bucuresti. I think we manufactured about 15000 units until I left Romania in 1993. The production continued for a while after that but I do not have more info. I do have own one protptype.

Geroge Sauciuc from Romania adds:
The CIP-03 was used in public schools, for informatics classes. this mashine was delivery with tape recorder, external power supply unit, and with one programs tape (all Romanian programs because at this period, all programs must be made in Romania).

Liviu A. Stefanescu reports:
I am the RF designer ( electrical schematics final version after few revisions, PCB prototyping, several pilot runs, volume production) of the UHF modulator used in the HC models 85 and later. The UHF modulator was transforming the video composite signal into a TV channel signal specific to the standard D/K, usually one of the channels 25..30 , manufactured by I. Electronica was similar to the one used for computers HC85 and later HC models produced by ICE-Pipera. The modulator was a stand alone module that was being added on the Main board as needed. Some versions were not delivered with TV modulator.

We need more info about this computer ! If you designed, used, or have more info about this system, please send us pictures or anything you might find useful.
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Let''s clarify a little more precisely the situation of these versions of CIP. I do not dispute the merit of the teams that designed the hard. We were able to appreciate it, we the team of young engineers from the Electronic Service Piatra Neamt, who studied it meticulously, in order to design the starting boot and the Service Book: http://www.ioanrosca.com/didactica/electronica/caiet_service_electronica_1990/index.htm It was a small creative gem, both in terms of decoder (where it exploits excellent color theory and trigonometric operations), and elsewhere (such as RF modulator, etc.). We especially like the way the video memory referee governs / mixes the access of the processor and of the sync generator, so that, using inactive touches, no interruptions occur, and the Z80 processor can be used real time, so perfect determinst (that''s why the sound wasn''t disturbed either) But regarding the 2k boot (and not 4k - as Adrian Stancescu''s comment says), I specify that it was designed entirely by us at Piatra Neamt, together with a version of "Basic PN" (ie Piatra Neamt), perfectly compatible Spectrum (which forced us to an exhaustive analysis of the disassembly of the 16K) but which had some improvements (switching to Romanian instructions - so that the Roman puppies invited to use the computer not to be forced neocolonially to English, overturn the keyboard - in case of a key failure, optimize the load / save functions - so that it moves at turbo speeds) I designed the startup boot (with the main role of loading the operating system from the cassette) in only 2k of eprom memory, because CIP 1 did not have the 16K Basic system integrated in the ROM, so it had to be loaded from the audio cassettes . This formula was very flexible (the machine was not dedicated to an operating system) but it had delicate load issues, which led to the introduction of the 16k Basic ROM in later versions of CIP. The quality of the cassette players leaving much to be desired. forced, after long experiments, to incorporate in the 2k of the boot an "oscilloscope", usable in adjusting the playback heads, a copy editor - executed even without operating system, as well as for economy, load and save on turbo speeds - 150, 20 and 300$. I worked on more than 150 versions. I filed on March 27, 1989 an invention patent for this boot, placed in eprom. That''s why I don''t know how to interpret the statement: "and I programmed the super-optimized 4K Spectrum BIOS cassette loader + BASIC interpreter to go around the Sinclair Spectrum software copyright while still providing the ability to program in BASIC". I asked today the technical director of Electronics, eng. Mircea Gavriliu, which made this project possible, if there was any 4k boot, experimental. He does not remember such details. However, it is certain that CIP 1 came on the market with the boot designed by us in Piatra Neamt. I have a such a CIP in my house, and I also have the source code and all the proof of our work . Therefore, i hope that the author of the comment clarifies the issue, so that we are not left with the impression of an attempt to praise the work of others. 9 .02.2021 Ioan Rosca, electronics engineer, mathematician and architect of tele / informatics systems, designer of the boot for CIP 1

          
Tuesday 9th February 2021
Ioan Rosca (Romania/Canada)
http://www.ioanrosca.com

Let''s clarify a little more precisely the situation of these versions of CIP. I do not dispute the merit of the teams that designed the hard. We were able to appreciate it, we the team of young engineers from the Electronic Service Piatra Neamt, who studied it meticulously, in order to design the starting boot and the Service Book: http://www.ioanrosca.com/didactica/electronica/caiet_service_electronica_1990/index.htm It was a small creative gem, both in terms of decoder (where it exploits excellent color theory and trigonometric operations), and elsewhere (such as RF modulator, etc.). We especially like the way the video memory referee governs / mixes the access of the processor and of the sync generator, so that, using inactive touches, no interruptions occur, and the Z80 processor can be used real time, so perfect determinst (that''s why the sound wasn''t disturbed either) But regarding the 2k boot (and not 4k - as Adrian Stancescu''s comment says), I specify that it was designed entirely by us at Piatra Neamt, together with a version of "Basic PN" (ie Piatra Neamt), perfectly compatible Spectrum (which forced us to an exhaustive analysis of the disassembly of the 16K) but which had some improvements (switching to Romanian instructions - so that the Roman puppies invited to use the computer not to be forced neocolonially to English, overturn the keyboard - in case of a key failure, optimize the load / save functions - so that it moves at turbo speeds) I designed the startup boot (with the main role of loading the operating system from the cassette) in only 2k of eprom memory, because CIP 1 did not have the 16K Basic system integrated in the ROM, so it had to be loaded from the audio cassettes . This formula was very flexible (the machine was not dedicated to an operating system) but it had delicate load issues, which led to the introduction of the 16k Basic ROM in later versions of CIP. The quality of the cassette players leaving much to be desired. forced, after long experiments, to incorporate in the 2k of the boot an "oscilloscope", usable in adjusting the playback heads, a copy editor - executed even without operating system, as well as for economy, load and save on turbo speeds - 150, 20 and 300$. I worked on more than 150 versions. I filed on March 27, 1989 an invention patent for this boot, placed in eprom. That''s why I don''t know how to interpret the statement: "and I programmed the super-optimized 4K Spectrum BIOS cassette loader + BASIC interpreter to go around the Sinclair Spectrum software copyright while still providing the ability to program in BASIC". I asked today the technical director of Electronics, eng. Mircea Gavriliu, which made this project possible, if there was any 4k boot, experimental. He does not remember such details. However, it is certain that CIP 1 came on the market with the boot designed by us in Piatra Neamt. I have a such a CIP in my house, and I also have the source code and all the proof of our work . Therefore, i hope that the author of the comment clarifies the issue, so that we are not left with the impression of an attempt to praise the work of others. 9 .02.2021 Ioan Rosca, electronics engineer, mathematician and architect of tele / informatics systems, designer of the boot for CIP 1

          
Tuesday 9th February 2021
Ioan Rosca (Romania/Canada)
http://www.ioanrosca.com

Let''s clarify a little more precisely the situation of these versions of CIP. I do not dispute the merit of the teams that designed the hard. We were able to appreciate it, we the team of young engineers from the Electronic Service Piatra Neamt, who studied it meticulously, in order to design the starting boot and the Service Book: http://www.ioanrosca.com/didactica/electronica/caiet_service_electronica_1990/index.htm It was a small creative gem, both in terms of decoder (where it exploits excellent color theory and trigonometric operations), and elsewhere (such as RF modulator, etc.). We especially like the way the video memory referee governs / mixes the access of the processor and of the sync generator, so that, using inactive touches, no interruptions occur, and the Z80 processor can be used real time, so perfect determinst (that''s why the sound wasn''t disturbed either) But regarding the 2k boot (and not 4k - as Adrian Stancescu''s comment says), I specify that it was designed entirely by us at Piatra Neamt, together with a version of "Basic PN" (ie Piatra Neamt), perfectly compatible Spectrum (which forced us to an exhaustive analysis of the disassembly of the 16K) but which had some improvements (switching to Romanian instructions - so that the Roman puppies invited to use the computer not to be forced neocolonially to English, overturn the keyboard - in case of a key failure, optimize the load / save functions - so that it moves at turbo speeds) I designed the startup boot (with the main role of loading the operating system from the cassette) in only 2k of eprom memory, because CIP 1 did not have the 16K Basic system integrated in the ROM, so it had to be loaded from the audio cassettes . This formula was very flexible (the machine was not dedicated to an operating system) but it had delicate load issues, which led to the introduction of the 16k Basic ROM in later versions of CIP. The quality of the cassette players leaving much to be desired. forced, after long experiments, to incorporate in the 2k of the boot an "oscilloscope", usable in adjusting the playback heads, a copy editor - executed even without operating system, as well as for economy, load and save on turbo speeds - 150, 20 and 300$. I worked on more than 150 versions. I filed on March 27, 1989 an invention patent for this boot, placed in eprom. That''s why I don''t know how to interpret the statement: "and I programmed the super-optimized 4K Spectrum BIOS cassette loader + BASIC interpreter to go around the Sinclair Spectrum software copyright while still providing the ability to program in BASIC". I asked today the technical director of Electronics, eng. Mircea Gavriliu, which made this project possible, if there was any 4k boot, experimental. He does not remember such details. However, it is certain that CIP 1 came on the market with the boot designed by us in Piatra Neamt. I have a such a CIP in my house, and I also have the source code and all the proof of our work . Therefore, i hope that the author of the comment clarifies the issue, so that we are not left with the impression of an attempt to praise the work of others. 9 .02.2021 Ioan Rosca, electronics engineer, mathematician and architect of tele / informatics systems, designer of the boot for CIP 1

          
Tuesday 9th February 2021
Ioan Rosca (Romania/Canada)
http://www.ioanrosca.com

 

NAME  CIP-03
MANUFACTURER  Electronica
TYPE  Home Computer
ORIGIN  Romania
YEAR  1988
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  Spectrum Basic interpreter
KEYBOARD  Mechanical 40 keys
CPU  MMN-80 an East European clone version of the Z80-A
SPEED  3.5 Mhz.
RAM  64 KB
ROM  16 KB (Spectrum O.S. and BASIC)
TEXT MODES  32 columns x 24 lines
GRAPHIC MODES  256 x 192 pixels
COLORS  16 (8 colours in normal or bright modes)
SOUND  Beeper (10 octaves)
SIZE / WEIGHT  32.5 (W) x 28(D) x 5.5 (H) cm.
I/O PORTS  Tape recorder, Expansion bus, Composite video, TV aerial, AC adaptor
POWER SUPPLY  External power supply unit 5V 3A Central polarity: Plus
PRICE  15000 lei (almost $500)




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