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Welcome to old-computers.com, the most popular website for old computers.
Have a trip down memory lane re-discovering your old computer, console or software you used to have.

There are actually 1284 systems in the museum.


SHOW ME A RANDOM SYSTEM !

   LATEST ADDITIONS
LOGICAL MACHINE CORPORATION (LOMAC) Goliath
Logical’s Goliath is a server or disk file storage device has it was described at the time. It has a capacity for 10 MByte, 30 MByte or 50 MByte of fixed disk storage and 10 MBytes of removable storage. The unit, which also houses the controller, may have memory ranging from 64K to 256K and capacity for up to 20 terminals. Up to 20 Tina or David computers can link to Goliath as a distributed data processing system. For ...
LOGICAL MACHINE CORPORATION (LOMAC) Adam
The Adam was the first computer released by Logical Machine Corporation (LOMAC) in 1975. In 1978 they also produced Tina which stands for "TINy Adam". In 1983 Logical released the David, and the L-XT in 1983. There was also the Goliath, a data storage server with 5MB hard drive. Goliath could be connected to up to 20 Davids or Tinas. David and Goliath names makes a clear reference to the mythic...
LOGICAL MACHINE CORPORATION (LOMAC) Tina
The Adam was the first computer released by Logical Machine Corporation (LOMAC) in 1976. In 1978 they produced Tina which stands for "TINy Adam". It seems to have the same specs as David but with two 8'' floppy disk drives. There was also the Goliath, a data storage server with 5MB hard drive. Goliath could be connected to up to 20 Davids or Tinas. David and Goliath names makes a clear reference to the mythical story found in the biblical Book of S...
LOGICAL MACHINE CORPORATION (LOMAC) L-XT
The L-XT was the last computer released by Logical Business Machines, after the Adam, the David, the Tina and the Goliath in 1982. It was announced at the 1983 COMDEX Fall in Las Vegas, and commercially available in March 1984. The L-XT uses a 16-bit Intel 8088 CPU with 192KB RAM, and equipped with a 5.25'' floppy drive unit (320 KB capacity) and a 10 MB hard disk (upgradable to 60 MB)...
LOGICAL MACHINE CORPORATION (LOMAC) David
The David is not the first computer released by Logical Business Machines. In 1974, LOMAC (Logical Machine Corporation) released the Adam. Some times later they also produced Tina (for TINy Adam). There was also the Goliath, a data storage server with 5MB hard drive. Goliath could be connected to up to 20 Davids or Tinas. David and Goliath names makes a clear reference to the mythical story found in the biblical Book of Samuel. The David is powered by a 16-bit Intel 8086 CPU w...
GESPAC Gescomp 720 / 730
GESPAC SA was a Swiss company who designed the G-64/96 Bus in 1979. This interface bus concept provides a simple way to interface microprocessor modules with memory and peripheral modules on a parallel bus. The G-64/96 Bus uses a simple, yet modern and powerful interface scheme which allows a higher level of functionality from the single height Eurocard form factor. The low overhead of the G-64/96 Bus interface greatly eases the design of custom boards by the User. This is why, even many year...
WELECT  W86
The W86 is a french computer released in 1983 by Welect. It's the second computer released by Welect after the W80.2. The W86 is powered by an Intel 8086 (hence its name) to catch up with the IBM PC compatible trend of the moment and is thus able to run MS-DOS. But the W86 is also equipped with a Z80A to also be CP/M compatible. It's thus an hybrid machine typical of the mid-80s when the professional industry was moving from CP/M to MS-DOS. There is 128 KB...
SMOKE SIGNAL CHIEFTAIN COMPUTERS The Chieftain 9822
In 1978, Smoke Signal Chieftain Computers (SSCC) released their first computer: The Chieftain, followed in 1980 by the Chieftain Business System, an update to the original Chieftain. At the start of 1982, the company introduced the Chieftain 9822, an update to the Business System featuring the same processor and static RAM options, as well as the same nine-slot bus equipped with the first two Chieftains. The system could be equipped with either two 8-inch or two 5.25-inch floppy drives and...
BRIDGE COMPUTER COMPANY Bridge 3C
The Bridge 3C seems to be a rebranded InterSystems DPS-1 computer sold with Televideo terminals. Apparently the Bridge 3C was delivered with the following software: CP/M 2.2, BMATE word processor, R80 RATFOR preprocessor, FORTRAN compiler, Enhanced FORTRAN, Pascal-Z and C compiler. The following extensions/options were advertised for the Bridge 3C: - FPP: system calendar, 3 interval timers, one additional serial port, and a 9511 floating point processor wi...
OSM COMPUTER CORPORATION Zeus 3X
OSM Computer Corporation, based in Santa Clara California, produced several multi-user CP/M computers called Zeus. The Zeus 3X was released in 1983, and is a natural follow-up of previous systems: Zeus, Zeus II, Zeus 3. The Zeus 3X was available as the same time as the Zeus 4, in which it differs in some features (more users, more memory, tape drive, real time clock, etc.) making it more suited for larger companies. The OSM Z...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
HANIMEX  666
This is a handheld pong. The biggest paddle includes the system hardware. The second one wich is smaller (1/3 of the system size) is attached to the first one but can be detached. Thus, this is a real portable and easy to carry pong system. The 666s and 666t seem to be similar in every ways apart from their color: the 666s is blue while the 666t is green. Note that there is a french version of the 666s called the 666s-p (P for PAL ?) while the 666s-n is the eng...
SPORTRON 101U
This is a very common european system. It was released by numerous manufacturers such as Intel (Germany), Asaflex, Univox, Interstate and others, and exists in two versions: 4 and 6 games (model 105 ?). The case can be black or white and the controllers can change. It has big orange buttons and large game selection wheel. It was released in 1977 and uses the popular AY-3-8500 chip grom General Instruments offering the 4 classic pong games : Hockey, Tenn...
CANON  Object.Station
After NeXT abandoned the hardware business,Canon (who had a large investment in NeXT) bought the licence and started producing the successor to the NeXTstation. The Object Station was an Intel-based PC specifically adapted to run the NEXTSTEP O/S. There were two versions available, the 31 and the 41, with IDE & SCSI being the main difference. There are also specs for a Pentium-based 51 but it remains unclear whether it actually came to market. The computer could also run Windows and othe...
ACORN COMPUTER  ABC 110
The ABC 110 had essentially the same technical features as the Cambridge Workstation ABC 210 apart from the main processor, which was a Z80 card instead of the 32016 card. It also had a 10 MB hard disk instead of 20 MB. Thanks to Chris Whytehead for info and pictures. ...
BANDAI WonderSwan
The WonderSwan was developed by Yokoi Gunpei (known as the father of the Nintendo Game Boy). A low price point and extremely low battery consumption is considered to be the original vision of Yokoi. Sadly, Yokoi died in a car accident before seeing a completed WonderSwan. Most of the games for the WonderSwan were based on Japanese Anime series. The system had no success outside of the Japanese domestic market, mainly beacause it was not ditributed and marketed efficiently. One of the system'...
TANDY RADIO SHACK  1000
The Tandy 1000 was a line of IBM PC compatible computers made during the 1980’s by the American Tandy Corporation for sale in their chain of Radio Shack electronics stores in Canada and the USA. The Tandy 1000 would be the successor to their influential TRS-80 line of computers, the Tandy 1000 would eventually replace the COCO line of 8 bit computers as well when Tandy decided to prematurely end tha...
RABBIT COMPUTER Wrap Bit II
A year after the announcement of the Rabbit RX83 Color Computer, the Hong-Kong based company reveal their new computer: the Wrap Bit II. It's weird machine powered by a Z80, built-in an IBM style keyboard and offering full Coleco Adam compatibility (with the right optional interface) ! Problem, we don't even know if the Wrap Bit II was ever really released... On power up the machine displays the "Rabbit Computer Inc" logo and waits for a key to be pressed....
CZERWENY CZ-2000
Very little info about this computer which came from Czerweny Electrónica in Argentina. The company also supplied parts (transformers, fans...) to numerous computer factories in the world. The CZ-2000 was a pure Sinclair Spectrum compatible system. The motherboard (Issue 4) was imported from Sinclair branch in Portugal. In Argentina Czerweny models competed with Brazilians TK 83, 85, 90x and genuine Sinclair machines, but CZ sold more machines than them...
ICE-FELIX HC-2000
The HC-2000 was an upgraded version of the HC-91+. It was also compatible with the Sinclair Spectrum but could run as well the CP/M operating system and all its associated software. It was actually an HC-91 with internal disk interface and 3.5" floppy disk drive. Major hardware differences were a white larger case housing the floppy drive, and 64 KB of RAM of which 48 KB were available in Spectrum mode, and 56 KB in CP/M mode. ...
PHILIPS  Videopac G7000
Magnavox (which merged with Philips in 1974) released the Odyssey˛ in 1978 to compete with brand new cartridge based video game systems like the Atari VCS, RCA Studio II or Fair-Child Electronics Channel-F. The Videopac G7000 is the european version of the Magnavox Odyssey˛. It was sold by Philips and was only available in Europe. Other brands...

   LATEST COMMENTS
Savior2022
8/14/2022
MEMOTECH  MTX 500 /512
I found mtx512 games https://www.mediafire.com/file/2tz3ngv9zlhpkgt/MEMOTECH_MTX512_Ultimate_Game_pack_v1.0_$2528BKL$2529.zip/file https://archive.org/search.php?query$memotech

Garry
8/13/2022
DICK SMITH VZ300
Great computer

TB99
8/10/2022
VIDEO TECHNOLOGY  LASER 3000
I had the vtech 3000 version sold in the USA. It didn''''t support Low-Res Apple II mode$this would show garble on the screen..Lots of freeware/Public domain software used this mode. Also, some of the ads in computer shopper implied it had 192k of RAM, when in reality, it only had 64k, so any 128K //c-//e software was out too. The Up arrow key didn''''t work in Apple II software, although it did seem to work in the enclosed "Magic //e" word processor. It also came with MagicMemory Database and MagicCalc spreadsheet. I couldn''''t get Ultima V to load on it, even though the box said 64k. I''''d say most high-res 64k games did work though.

TB99
8/10/2022
DICK SMITH Cat
I had the vtech 3000 version sold in the USA. It didn''t support Low-Res Apple II mode$this would show garble on the screen..Lots of freeware/Public domain software used this mode. Also, some of the ads in computer shopper implied it had 192k of RAM, when in reality, it only had 64k, so any 128K //c-//e software was out too. The Up arrow key didn''t work in Apple II software, although it did seem to work in the enclosed "Magic //e" word processor. It also came with MagicMemory Database and MagicCalc spreadsheet. I couldn''t get Ultima V to load on it, even though the box said 64k. I''d say most high-res 64k games did work though.

Ken Bolt
8/9/2022
DURANGO F85
I want to donate my Durango F85 computer. Purchased about 1980. Please text or phone me at 905-741-2658 Ken Bolt

Larry Sh.
8/7/2022
XEROX  820-II
Again, not a "bad" computer per se, but much better was out there in 1983. 8" floppies where already sliding into obsolescence. Some of the same great software was becoming available for the new IBM PC and PC/XT and the new Apple //e had some great productivity software coming soon. This was a case of too little improvement coming too late. A Kaypro 10 was a better deal that was at least as good, or better, at a lower price and excellent build quality. Xerox leadership was caught in the 1970''s or something.

Larry Sh.
8/7/2022
XEROX  820
The idea behind this computer seems solid even if very conservative. A well build and set up CP/M box was a popular idea. But for the price tag the deal was not so hot. You could get a Transportable from Osborne or later Kaypro for cheaper and often have a faster CPU as a great bonus (2.5 vs 4 MHz Z-80). Basing it on the hobbyist "Big Board" was them being cheap and lazy because they sure as hell did not charge a "hobbyist price". Even a "good" system can fail miserably when so much better is around for better prices.


   RANDOM SOFTWARE TITLES
DODGE IT (VIDEOCART-16)
Fairchild Channel F
Fairchild - 1978
 game -
GET YOUR GADGET
Comx
Junior - 1984
 game - 2d - helicopter - shoot them up
SEA BATLLE (M12)
MPT-03 and Arcadia systems
UA Limited (developer) - 1982
 game - boat - naval battle - ocean - sea - strategy - submarine - war
SPACE INVADERS (G-1045)
Sega SG-1000 compatible systems
Sega, Taito - 1985
 game - shoot them up
SUPER BASEBALL (05)
Epoch Super Cassette Vision
Epoch - 1984
 game - baseball - sport
PACAR (G-1020)
Sega SG-1000 compatible systems
Sega - 1983
 game - car - maze
BASIC LEVEL III A (B-30)
Sega SC 3000/SC 3000H
MITEC - 1983
 application - basic - programming language
SPORT GAMES (1)
Bandai TV Jack 5000
Bandai (publisher) - 1978
 game - ball and paddle - basketball - football - hockey - lightgun - shooting gallery - sport - squash - tennis
HUSTLE
Arcade
Gremlin - 1977
rating is 2rating is 2rating is 2rating is 2rating is 2
 game - eat them all - snake game
SPEEDWAY / TAG (RCA STUDIO II) (18V404)
RCA Studio II
RCA - 1977
 game - car - racing
SCRAMBLE
Arcade
Konami - 1981
 game - horizontal scrolling - shoot them up - space
SKI
Magnavox Odyssey
Magnavox - 1972
 game - skiing - sport
HOCKEY
GI AY-3-8500 (4 games)
General Instruments - 1976
 game - ball and paddle - football - hockey - sport
SOUKOBAN (C-56)
Sega SG-1000 compatible systems
Sega, Thinking Rabbit - 1985
 game - puzzle
SANGOKUSHI IV (32X)
Sega Mega Drive compatible systems
Koei, Sega - 1995
 game -

   RANDOM ADVERTS
3 page U.S. advert

EPSON
HC / HX-20

 
U.S. advert (1977)

NORTHSTAR
Horizon

 
U.S. advert (1982)

SEATTLE COMPUTER
Gazelle

 
UK advert (1984)

ORIC
ATMOS

 
Advert #3

HONEYWELL
DDP-516

 
UK advert, Oct. 1983

GEMINI
GALAXY

 
Advert #3

ATARI
800

 
Comparison chart #2

PANASONIC
JD series

 
French advert.

ORIC
TELESTRAT

 
Kit version (1982)

SINCLAIR
ZX 81

 
US advert (april 198...

VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
Visual 1050

 
US ad. 1983 #2

KAYPRO
Kaypro II

 
US advert, Nov. 1985

AMPERE
WS 1

 
Spanish advert (may ...

PHILIPS
P2000 T/M

 
French Advert.

VIDEO TECHNOLOGY
LASER 310

 
Promo picture

TELEVIDEO
TS-803

 
New-Zealand advert (...

NCR
PC4

 
Radiola advert. 1

PHILIPS
VG 5000

 
AmigaWorld preview

COMMODORE
AMIGA 4000

 
Personal Computer Wo...

HEWLETT PACKARD
HP-110

 
Promotional leaflet ...

VICTOR
HC-6

 
German advert

COMMODORE
C64

 
US ad. June 1983

DYNALOGIC
HYPERION

 
U.S. advert (1982)

APPLE
APPLE III

 
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