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A > ACORN COMPUTER  > BBC Master


 

This mini forum is intended to provide a simple means of discussion about the Acorn Computer  BBC Master computer. If you want to share your own experience or memories, or add relevant information about this system: post a message! For other purposes like sales messages, hardware & software questions or information requests, please use our main forum.

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Saturday 19th April 2014
Chris Jordan (UK)

David wrote: "the BBC B used the IC18 Sound Generator and the BBC Master the IC38 which offered the same number of channels (4) but slightly better quality sound. ... the BBC B+ also used the IC38!"

David, ICXX is simply Acorn''s own designation for the position of the IC in the circuit. What identifies the Sound Generator is the manufacturer''s part number - SN76496 in the Model B and B+, and the SN76489 in the Master. There is no difference in the sound output quality between these two chips.

By the way, are you the David Shepherd who wrote Atom Minotaur? I''m the Chris Jordan who designed the sound firmware driving the above chips in the BBC Micro.


Wednesday 2nd April 2014
David Shepherd

"I believe this inaccurate. I recall no improvement in the sound feature between these two models."

Pedantically yes, the BBC B used the IC18 Sound Generator and the BBC Master the IC38 which offered the same number of channels (4) but slightly better quality sound.

I say pedantically, because the BBC B+ also used the IC38!


Monday 3rd February 2014
Chris Jordan

"The BBC Master was an enhanced version of the BBC Model B providing improved features... These features were: ... 4 sound channels"

I believe this inaccurate. I recall no improvement in the sound feature between these two models.


Tuesday 30th October 2012
Matthijs (Netherland)

As far as I remember de BBC Master512 ran DR-DOS en not MS-DOS.
However you could play Flight Simulator on it. $-)
Also were able to program in Turbo Pascal.


Thursday 22nd March 2012
Userus

Most accomplished 8-bit home computers? For home games were much important while BBC''s had inferior graphics system. You may compare with MSX2 appeared the same year, for example.


Thursday 20th January 2011
Mark (England )

Does anyone know if the BBC B or Master has been put into VHDL code so it can be put onto a single chip ??

I know it''s been done for other old retro machines !! Might make a good project for a programmer proficiency in VDHL /Verilog programming.


Sunday 19th December 2010
John H

I started programming on one of these (actually on a model B in school)$ I''m now a senior software engineer on large server projects. It struck me the other day, there must be tens of thousands of professional programmers and engineers now active who all owe their careers to the BBC Computers In Schools project. Awesome, when you come to think about it.


Sunday 5th September 2004
Steve (Adelaide, Australia)

My high school had these things up until 1994 when they were replaced with Macs! I always loved seeing these in action in the late 80's at the library there (before I started at that school in 93) with networking and games like Xor. They were a well designed computer, the fact that they hung around for so long says something.
From the previous page, I think an Australian school having BBC micro's must have been something of an anomaly.





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