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A > APPLE  > MACINTOSH II


 

This mini forum is intended to provide a simple means of discussion about the Apple  MACINTOSH II computer. If you want to share your own experience or memories, or add relevant information about this system: post a message! For other purposes like sales messages, hardware & software questions or information requests, please use our main forum.

  Click Here to add a message in the forum

 

Saturday 20th August 2016
Régis Schmidt (France)

The first Color Macintosh of the lab. It drived a double-line CCD sensor for astronomical applications.


Wednesday 16th November 2011
mike brohez (United States)

i need to talk to a macII owner about software copy


Saturday 15th October 2011
Ernest

To Wally from Ohio, I think your statistics are a bit skewed. I would like to know how a 15Mhz difference in CPU speed (25Mhz of the A3000 to 40Mhz of Mac IIfx) would result in a 10 fold performance increase.

I could go on at length as to why the Amiga was superior to the Macintosh. The Amiga 3000 started at just over $3000, while the Mac IIfx started at $9000 and went up to $12000. For less than half the base price of a Mac IIfx I could have added a few extras to an A3000 that would run circles around even a higher end Mac IIfx.

Hardware aside, even the AmigaOS was superior to MacOS. The first AmigaOS supported true pre-emptive multitasking since it''s initial release in 1985. A feature that Mac didn''t get until OSX was released in 1999.

While Mac and Amiga did at times play leap-frog with each other capability wise, Amiga held it''s lead for the first 2+ years of it''s release and continued to release hardware that would outstrip a comparable Mac at a fraction of the Mac''s price tag.


Thursday 10th February 2011
MIKE T (USA)

I have an Apple II, I was just wondering how much they go for. Like on ebay?


Thursday 6th January 2011
wally (Ohio, US)

The best thing about the Macintosh IIfx was that it stripped the then competing Amiga 3000 system 10 fold. A 40 MHz 68030 CPU was used and the Amiga 3000 only had 25 MHz

It was the only 32-bit clean variation of the Mac II series.


Wednesday 4th August 2010
Markus (Germany)

The Mac II series was quite good, for the most part.
It was possible to swap the motherboards of the Mac II for the one of the Macintosh IIx or IIfx. THAT is compatibility. Every Mac II could have been upgraded with a FDHD SuperDrive upgrade, including disk drives and some chips (and the IWM disk controller was swapped in for a SWIM, compatible with OS/2, DOS/FAT 12 and Apple II ProDOS disks). And the design of the case still lookes good. But RAM was limited to 8 MB (due to the 24-bit addressing mode used) without Mode32, and limited to 20 MB with Mode32, but WITHOUT the SuperDrive upgrade. Maximum Mac OS is version 7.5.5 for Mac II and Mac IIx because of the "32-bit dirty" ROM.


Friday 4th June 2010
Erik N (Australia)

I used to own a Mac II - well, my dad had one at his work and they were giving them away when I was 4-5 years old. I got one complete with working monitor, played games and stuff on it, sold it last year - but to this day I am still puzzled at how high resolution high quality images could fit on a 3.5" 800k disk.


Tuesday 1st April 2008
Andrew Pantini

I was working for an Apple computer dealer (yes, they had dealers in those days), when the Mac II came out and it was the hottest thing since sliced bread. Because Apple had made inroads in the desktop publishing market, this was highly prized by publishers because it was much easier to expand than the all-in-one Mac systems.

Two things stand out that come to mind. The first was that this was the first computer I knew that could support large monitors. It was not uncommon for customers to purchase 21 inch color monitors that would allow them to lay out publications in a side-by-side page format.

The second is the price. This was a VERY expensive computer - nearly $4000 just for the box and it wasn't uncommon to spend another $5000 on a large color monitor and 24-bit video card.


Friday 9th March 2007
Ricardo (Earth)

The Macintosh II was a ultimateley expandable Mac for times, you can run it uo to System 7.5 which. The Mac II was an important computer in the Desktop publishing era.


Friday 8th April 2005
Link (Hyrule)

Yes, the bondi iMac did use VGA. The internal monitor connects to a standard DB15 port inside the case.


Monday 15th March 2004
Thor Madsen (Chicago)

Talk about a great design. I once sold graphic systems - and walked through setting up a card/software in a PC and then this. Nightmare v. Pleasure. The next day I went out and bought a Mac SE.


Friday 2nd May 2003
The Clothist (Seattle)

Glad to see the Mac II in it's fair place in a museum such as this. I believe that the original Macintosh II series computers were some of the best products Apple ever put out, and I have gone to lengths to rescue them from garbage dumps, etc., and find them good homes. As a matter of fact, I am writing this on a model IIsi ^_^


Saturday 15th June 2002
Bennett Harris (Racine, Wisconsin)

Are you selling your Mac2 becase if you are I would be quit interested





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