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- There are now 992 computers in the museum -




   LATEST ADDITIONS
OLIVETTI  A5
Olivetti introduced a mainframe about 1960 which was called ELEA, then in 1965 the Programma 101 - which was probably the world's first real desktop computer. Then a little later they introduced the Audiotronic range of "office computers". The first was the A770, which was replaced by the A7. The A5 was the desktop version. The Olivetti Audit 5 or A5 was largely an electro mechanical computer. It printed via a golf ball typewritter mechanism at the astonishing speed of 16 character per second...
TRIUMPH ADLER  TA-1600
The TA 1600 system was introduced in 1983 at the CeBIT (which was only a part of the "Hannover-Messe" by that time). TA showed a few sample applications and the 1600 family in general. Triumph Adler's hardware included also the 1600/20-3 which was supplied with a permanent-swap-HDD-unit. This unit had a memory/storage capacity of 2 x 8 MB (Winchester technology). Triumph Adler said the system (the 1600) will fit the demand of medium-sized businesses, due to the facts that these companies w...
MIDWICH Microcontroller
Called the Midwich Microcontroller, this British computer was developped to provide a small desktop micro capable of running other equipment throug a variety of interface cards. In 1979 an Italian IC manufacturer designed and began to sell a single board micro system that could be expanded to a full system with a VDU, discs, etc. Called the Nanocomputer, it was manufactured by SGS Ates and one of the distributors in the UK was Midwich. The Nano was somewhat expensive and suffered from a numbe...
RADIONIC Model R1001
This is an extremly rare TRS-80 Model 1 clone, based on an other clone: The Komtek 1 (from Germany). It's equiped with a Level II basic and powered by a Zilog Z80 cpu. _________ Contributors : Incog...
BASF 7100
The BASF 7000 systems are professional computers from Germany. They seem to be based on the Microterm II Intelligent Terminal by Digi-Log Systems, Inc. There were several models in the 7000 serie....
PERTEC PCC 2000
PCC 2000 is a professional computer released in 1978. It was designed in 1978 by Pertec, the company which merged with MITS by the end of 1976. The PCC is conceived as a monobloc machine, where the display and two 8" floppy disk drives are built-in the main case. The mechanical keyboard offers separated numeric and editing keypads. The system is powered by an Intel 8085 microprocessor and offers 64 KB RAM. The whole thing was apparently delivered with an extended Basic language, which has...
TERTA TAP-34
TAP 34 is a self design of Terta company from Hungary. Primarily it was designed as a terminal for big computer systems but it was also able to process data alone. The main integrated circuits were assembled in the USSR and in Hungary by Tungsram, but several parts were imported from other countries. The built-in monitor was a DME-28 monochrome CRT made by Orion. This company was famous for its televisions in Hungary and the other KGST countries. The floppy drive attached to the compute...
MCM COMPUTERS  MCM 800
Based on the MCM 70 / 700 (see this entry for more info), the MCM 800 followed in 1976. It was faster, included 16 KB RAM (instead of 8 KB for the 700), and included the ability to drive an external monitor. Among other things, MCM 800s were used in one of the first french industrial network called Gixinet (along with ARCnet). This was a token-bus type network developped by the Gixi company....
IMLAC PDS-1
The Imlac PDS-1 is a graphical minicomputer made by Imlac Corporation (founded in 1968) of Needham, Massachusetts. The PDS-1 debuted in 1970 and is considered to be the predecessor of all later graphical minicomputers and modern computer workstations. The PDS-1 had a built-in display list processor and 4096 16-bit words of core RAM. The PDS-1 used a vector display processor for displaying vector graphics as opposed to the raster graphics of modern computer displays. The PDS-1 was often used with...
COMMODORE  C64 Golden Jubilee
Between 1984 (in the U.S.) and 1986 (in Germany), Commodore International celebrated the 1,000,000 machines sold mark in these respective countries by issuing special "Gold" editions of the Commodore C64. These machines were regular C64 models, except they were Golden-colored and fixed on a commemorative plate. The following information comes from Death Adder : Until December 1986, 1,000,000 Commodore 64s were sold in Germany. On this occasion, Commodore Buromaschinen GmbH (...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
G.Z.E. UNIMOR Bosman 8
The Bosman 8, was made by "G.Z.E. Unimor" (Gdanskie Zaklady Elektroniczne Unimor) in Poland (Gdansk to be precise). It was released in 1987 as a system for schools and offices, but even CAD/CAM software was developed for this machine and later, as being too expensive (cost 1 300 000 zl) and extremely hard to get (apparently only 1000 models have been produced), Bosman 8 was used mainly as a terminal for automatized processes (designing printed boards). The main particularity of the Bos...
GRID Compass
The Compass portable was the first computer of the Grid company; and the very first clamshell laptop (GRiD had the patent on the clamshell idea). It was an expensive portable business computer incorporating large memories (both RAM and data storage) for the time, but above all one of the first graphic amber plasma flat screen. It was housed in in a matt-black finished magnesium case. Not only does this gave increased protection (and weight) that some plastic shells, it also acted as a heat...
SHARP  X68000 XVI
The X68000 16 is the successor of the X68000 Super and Super HD. It has new features : 16 MHz instead of 10 MHz (though it can still operate at 10 Mhz) and a new version of the Operating system and its GUI....
OLIVETTI  Prodest PC 128
The Prodest PC-128 was a rebadged and slightly redesigned version of the French Thomson MO6 Apart from case design touching up, technical features was the same as the MO6. This machine seems having been sold in very small quantity in Italy. ...
SONY  Hit-Bit 501
This is a quite particular MSX 1 computer as it has a tape-recorder built-in (BitCorder)with its own counter, and a kind of joystick screwable in the middle of the cursor keys, a bit like the Spectravideo SV-318. Apart from that, it seems to be the same machine as the Hit-Bit 75. There is even the same built-in software (Personal Data Bank) composed of an agenda, a memo and an address manager, with which you can save your work w...
MICROKEY KFFT  PRIMO A-32
The Primo computer series was manufactured by Microkey Kftt. (Kutatási Fejlesztési Termelési Társulás), and was originaly developed to be a school computer in Hungary. The system was sold in various memory configurations: A-32: 16K ROM 16K RAM A-48: 16K ROM 32K RAM A-64: 16K ROM 48K RAM B-64: 16K ROM 48K RAM Other differences were: A type did not have built-in joystick and serial ports. B type could works togewther with the Commodore VC1541 floppy drive un...
SONY  Hit-Bit 20
The Hit-Bit 20 is a very basic MSX "1" computer. It looks very similar to the Hit-Bit 10. If someone could tell us the difference that would be nice. It seems to have been sold only in Spain... The Hit-Bit 20P model has a spanish keyboard, which is strange, as if we follow the Sony naming logic, the Spanish model would have been called Hit-Bit 20S, and not Hit-Bit 20P which was reserved for PAL models which didn't need a special...
SYSTEM FORMULET INC.  BUBCOM 80
Almost nothing is known about this rare japanese system... Apparently its was first marketed as the System Formulet Bubcom 80, then bought back by Fujitsu and sold as the Fujitsu Bubcom 80. Originaly it was a CP/M machine which used Fujitsu magnetic bubble memory. It had filesystem support for the bubble memory cartridge right in the CP/M BIOS. It seems also to have been one of the first japanese system to offer 8 colors display and is considered at the origin of the popular
PERTEC PCC 2000
PCC 2000 is a professional computer released in 1978. It was designed in 1978 by Pertec, the company which merged with MITS by the end of 1976. The PCC is conceived as a monobloc machine, where the display and two 8" floppy disk drives are built-in the main case. The mechanical keyboard offers separated numeric and editing keypads. The system is powered by an Intel 8085 microprocessor and offers 64 KB RAM. The whole thing was apparently delivered with an extended Basic language, which has...
ACORN COMPUTER  ABC 310
Acorn's ABC-310 was to be the flagship of the Acorn business computer range. As far as I can tell, the 310 is the rarest variant, and it is the only one to have no direct equivalent available via a 2nd Processor card. When the ABC range was dissolved, Acorn already had 2nd Processors (a method of adding a new CPU to the BBC, similar to adding a Z80 on a card to an Apple II, but very different in execution and with far more applications) - the 65C02, the Z80, the Acorn Scientific 16032 (1MB R...

   RANDOM ADVERTS
Japanese advert #4

CANON
X-07

 
Advert #3

HONEYWELL
DDP-516

 
Brochure #5

BAINBRIDGE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, INC.
Dolphin

 
U.S. advert (1976)

POLYMORPHIC
POLY 88

 
US advert, July 1985

CASIO
FP 6000

 
Lisa 1 pin

APPLE
LISA / LISA 2 - Mac XL

 
U.K. ad. (1986)

ATARI
520 / 1040 STf / STfm

 
French advert

MICRONIQUE
Victor / Hector 1

 
Dick Smith advert

DICK SMITH
Cat

 
Menta & Softy advert...

DATAMAN DESIGNS
Menta

 
Newburry brochure #3

GRUNDY
NEW BRAIN

 
Computer terminal to...

DIGITAL MICRO SYSTEMS
DMS-3/F

 
Orange+ US ad. (1983...

COLLINS INTERNATIONAL TRADING CORPORATION
Orange 2

 
UK advert (april 198...

GOLDSTAR
FC-80 / FC-200

 
French advert. (1984...

THOMSON
MO 5

 
Bridge Computer vers...

INTERSYSTEMS
DPS-1

 
Bit Shopper

MITS
ALTAIR 8800

 
New Zealand Review

SEMI-TECH
Pied Piper

 
UK advert (1984)

ORIC
ATMOS

 
Ontel advert #1

ONTEL
OP-1

 
Heathkit centers #2

HEATHKIT / ZENITH
H-89

 
U.S. advert (1982)

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
TI 99 / 4A

 
Jacquard brochure #2...

AM INTERNATIONAL JACQUARD SYSTEMS
J100 - J500

 
PC-60

COMMODORE
PC Compatible systems

 

   LATEST COMMENTS
Tom
8/27/2014
COMMODORE  C64
A piece of computer history. Sometimes I ask myself where we would be without it.

I must say, back in the day I hated the C64. I "grew up" on CBM30XX machines and owned a VIC-20. It was the arrogance of the C64 users toward the VIC which made me not want a C64 and in fact it wasn''t until sometime in the early 90s that I bought one of them (C64G) and only because it was dirt cheap. This one has been passed on to my brother a long time ago but I have since purchased an original C64 (the brown breadbox) and two C64C in a bundle for the horrendous sum of $1. One of the "C"s works the other two have faulty graphics. The screen just shows garbled rubbish on one and stays black on the other. Eventually they will be wall mounted in my study, (together with a VIC-20, a C16 and a TI99/4A). Now I am chasing a "Aldi C64", another C64G and if at all possible, a SX-64 to complete the collection.



AkirIkasu
8/27/2014
SHARP  PC-1260 PC-1261 PC-1262
For those stuck in Japanese, one should theoretically be able to just press the reset button on the back and it will be reset to whatever language your localized machine should be. You can change your system between Latin and Japanese characters easily with this program (provided by Pierre of the pocket computer museum forum at pocket.free.fr):

10 " " POKE 12349,10+NOT PEEK 12349: END

The problem is, if you actually have a Japanese one, you will not be able to write it because it types in Japanese. You should be able to shift into Latin characters by pressing Shift than SML, in theory.

This program will run whenever you press DEF and the space key. Make sure you are in PROG mode when you write it and in RUN mode when you want to run it. You can also put it on line 65279 so that you can write other more useful programs without erasing this part.

Daniele
8/27/2014
AMSTRAD  PC 1512
the 1512...
my very first PC
I learned everything about computer with it
really really cheap for that time
the best, and was british!
$-)

John Parkinson
8/25/2014
YAMAHA  CX5M Music Computer
CX5M - free to good home!
I have a Yamaha CX5M music computer together with YK-01 (piano) keyboard and NP55140 power supply.
As far as I know these worked when I last used them (20 years ago). I have no way of testing them now as the monitor out is a phono out socket and I don''t have a means of hooking this up to a modern monitor.

If anyone is interested in chancing the price of postage / or just collecting it (near Manchester, UK) - $ me a message on here.
John

EddieTheWild
8/22/2014
DATAPOINT CORPORATION Datapoint 2200
Hi Datapointers, any of you have technical info about Datapoint 1560? I have one that seems to boot but nothing is shown on the monitor (it and the keyboard light on).

I would like to know the pinout of the conector between the computer and monitor to try to connect the computer to any other third party monitor.

Thanks in advance!!

Massimo
8/20/2014
COMMODORE  PC Compatible systems
I owned a Commodore PC 20-III with a dual floppy disk (1-3,5" 720kB 2-5,25" 360kB) and a hard disk (20 MB). It featured a 12,66 MHz 8088 and came with a color monitor (the same sold with the Amiga 500).

To add value to the "technical informations" it also featured a CGA/Plantronix graphics card, capable of 320x200 at 16 of 256 colors. Unfortunately not many programs supported this colorful resolution at the time (once was deluxe paint).

A really good and robust machine with a beautiful and comfortable keyboard and a mouse (the same of amiga 500).


Massimo
8/20/2014
COMMODORE  PC Compatible systems
I owned a Commodore PC 20-III with a dual floppy disk (1-3,5" 720kB 2-5,25" 360kB) and a hard disk (20 MB). It featured a 12,66 MHz 8088 and came with a color monitor (the same sold with the Amiga 500).

To add value to the "technical informations" it also featured a CGA/Plantronix graphics card, capable of 320x200 at 16 of 256 colors. Unfortunately not many programs supported this colorful resolution at the time (once was deluxe paint).

A really good and robust machine with a beautiful and comfortable keyboard and a mouse (the same of amiga 500).


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