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- There are now 992 computers in the museum -




   LATEST ADDITIONS
OLIVETTI  A5
Olivetti introduced a mainframe about 1960 which was called ELEA, then in 1965 the Programma 101 - which was probably the world's first real desktop computer. Then a little later they introduced the Audiotronic range of "office computers". The first was the A770, which was replaced by the A7. The A5 was the desktop version. The Olivetti Audit 5 or A5 was largely an electro mechanical computer. It printed via a golf ball typewritter mechanism at the astonishing speed of 16 character per second...
TRIUMPH ADLER  TA-1600
The TA 1600 system was introduced in 1983 at the CeBIT (which was only a part of the "Hannover-Messe" by that time). TA showed a few sample applications and the 1600 family in general. Triumph Adler's hardware included also the 1600/20-3 which was supplied with a permanent-swap-HDD-unit. This unit had a memory/storage capacity of 2 x 8 MB (Winchester technology). Triumph Adler said the system (the 1600) will fit the demand of medium-sized businesses, due to the facts that these companies w...
MIDWICH Microcontroller
Called the Midwich Microcontroller, this British computer was developped to provide a small desktop micro capable of running other equipment throug a variety of interface cards. In 1979 an Italian IC manufacturer designed and began to sell a single board micro system that could be expanded to a full system with a VDU, discs, etc. Called the Nanocomputer, it was manufactured by SGS Ates and one of the distributors in the UK was Midwich. The Nano was somewhat expensive and suffered from a numbe...
RADIONIC Model R1001
This is an extremly rare TRS-80 Model 1 clone, based on an other clone: The Komtek 1 (from Germany). It's equiped with a Level II basic and powered by a Zilog Z80 cpu. _________ Contributors : Incog...
BASF 7100
The BASF 7000 systems are professional computers from Germany. They seem to be based on the Microterm II Intelligent Terminal by Digi-Log Systems, Inc. There were several models in the 7000 serie....
PERTEC PCC 2000
PCC 2000 is a professional computer released in 1978. It was designed in 1978 by Pertec, the company which merged with MITS by the end of 1976. The PCC is conceived as a monobloc machine, where the display and two 8" floppy disk drives are built-in the main case. The mechanical keyboard offers separated numeric and editing keypads. The system is powered by an Intel 8085 microprocessor and offers 64 KB RAM. The whole thing was apparently delivered with an extended Basic language, which has...
TERTA TAP-34
TAP 34 is a self design of Terta company from Hungary. Primarily it was designed as a terminal for big computer systems but it was also able to process data alone. The main integrated circuits were assembled in the USSR and in Hungary by Tungsram, but several parts were imported from other countries. The built-in monitor was a DME-28 monochrome CRT made by Orion. This company was famous for its televisions in Hungary and the other KGST countries. The floppy drive attached to the compute...
MCM COMPUTERS  MCM 800
Based on the MCM 70 / 700 (see this entry for more info), the MCM 800 followed in 1976. It was faster, included 16 KB RAM (instead of 8 KB for the 700), and included the ability to drive an external monitor. Among other things, MCM 800s were used in one of the first french industrial network called Gixinet (along with ARCnet). This was a token-bus type network developped by the Gixi company....
IMLAC PDS-1
The Imlac PDS-1 is a graphical minicomputer made by Imlac Corporation (founded in 1968) of Needham, Massachusetts. The PDS-1 debuted in 1970 and is considered to be the predecessor of all later graphical minicomputers and modern computer workstations. The PDS-1 had a built-in display list processor and 4096 16-bit words of core RAM. The PDS-1 used a vector display processor for displaying vector graphics as opposed to the raster graphics of modern computer displays. The PDS-1 was often used with...
COMMODORE  C64 Golden Jubilee
Between 1984 (in the U.S.) and 1986 (in Germany), Commodore International celebrated the 1,000,000 machines sold mark in these respective countries by issuing special "Gold" editions of the Commodore C64. These machines were regular C64 models, except they were Golden-colored and fixed on a commemorative plate. The following information comes from Death Adder : Until December 1986, 1,000,000 Commodore 64s were sold in Germany. On this occasion, Commodore Buromaschinen GmbH (...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
ATARI  MEGA ST
The Atari Mega ST was the "professionnal" version of the Atari STf. Atari added the "Blitter", a custom chip designed to perform quick memory moves and increase display speed. The Mega ST had a small battery to hold time and date and a small fan (except for the Mega ST1). This computer was especially designed to be the cheapest publishing solution (and it was!). The photo shows the Mega ST 4 (4 MB) with a monochrome display (640 x 400), the publishing softwar...
ACORN COMPUTER  Archimedes A5000
The Acorn A5000 was an all new model of the Archimedes family replacing the A540. It had 4 slots like previous models but a larger wider case making it look like a workstation computer. It was built on the new fast ARM3 processor as used in the A4 laptop. VGA output and new extra screen modes were introduced as well using cheap standardised IDE hard disks. The keyboard was the quality 'Brisbane' model as used on the previous high end Acorns. (Or could 'Brisbane' be the codename for the A...
COMMODORE  C64 Aldi
Externally, the C=64 Aldi had same case colour as a standard C=64 but the keyboard was light grey, like the future C=64G and C=64C. Internally, the motherboard was redesigned to minimize production costs, most of the TTL chips were removed, replaced with a new MMU chipset. First releases of this board had some compatibility problems with C=64 peripherals - they lacked the 9V user port voltage, ...
GEMINI  Challenger
Before the Challenger came out, Gemini products were based around the Z80 processor and the company's 80-bus architecture. They did well in applications where costumers wanted a highly-specialized product. At first sight, the Challenger looked like an ordinary PC-compatible computer. The monitor was a Wyse WY-50 remote terminal finished as the same colours as the main box. However, the Challenger's main processor was a 12 MHz Motorola 68000 linked with 512 KB of RAM. This configurati...
MOSTEK MD
The Mostek MD (from Micro Design) marked the entry of Mostek Company in the computer business. It was a development system, aimed at promoting the family of Mostek boards, and built around several boards based on the 64 pin SDT bus. The hearth of the system was the CPU board holding a Z80 (Mostek) processor, 10 KB of ROM and 8 KB of RAM. A large range of additional cards could be then added: dual Serial port, 32 KB RAM, Analogue/digital converter, 32-bit parallel port, and s...
ICE-FELIX HC-2000
The HC-2000 was an upgraded version of the HC-91+. It was also compatible with the Sinclair Spectrum but could run as well the CP/M operating system and all its associated software. It was actually an HC-91 with internal disk interface and 3.5" floppy disk drive. Major hardware differences were a white larger case housing the floppy drive, and 64 KB of RAM of which 48 KB were available in Spectrum mode, and 56 KB in CP/M mode. ...
SANYO  Wavy 10 (MPC 10)
The Wavy /MPC 10 is a classic MSX 1 computer with 32 KB RAM (some sources say 16 KB). Its main particularity is to be delivered with a light-pen. There is of course a connector to use it, and more surprising a hole is placed at the top right part of the case to store the light-pen when not in use! The MPC-100 seems to be the same computer with 64 KB....
THOMSON  TO 7 / 70
The TO-7/70 was presented alongside the MO5, in march 1984. While the MO-5 represents a small break into the TO-7 philosophy, the TO-7/70 follows and enhances the TO-7 features. The case of the TO-7/70 is almost the same as the TO-7 one : roughly triangular with sharp edges. The keyboard, though made of rubber keys, is an improvement over the flat membrane keyboard of the TO-7. The keyboard layout is AZERTY which is normal...
BANDAI Gundam RX-78
The Gundam RX-78 was originaly a very popular manga animation movie from the 80's. Bandai then marketed a personal computer under this name... Little is known about this small computer. Since the Gundam Rx-78 was only sold in Japan nearly all the information currently comes from Japanese websites. The capabilities of the RX-78 were not bad at all for 1983, and the space between the keys offered the possibility to use keyboard overlays with games or applications, except maybe for complaint...
TOSHIBA  T100-X Dynapad
Long before the tablet PC craze of fall 2002, there was the Toshiba T100X Dynapad. The T100X was a "pen-based computer" (This was before the term "tablet PC" existed) which ran on a 25MHz 386 AMD CPU. It shipped with 4MB RAM and had a 40MB hard disk drive for storage. It did not include an internal floppy disk drive, but a separate external floppy disk drive could be purchased. Similar to most modern tablet PCs, the T100X did not have a built-in keyboard, and mouse pointing was done with a st...

   RANDOM ADVERTS
French ad (jan. 1980...

NORTHSTAR
Horizon

 
French ad (dec. 1982...

SINCLAIR
ZX 81

 
French advertisement

AI ELECTRONICS
ABC 24

 
US advert #1

TANDY RADIO SHACK
Color Computer

 
German ad #4

SHARP
MZ 700

 
U.S. advert (1979)

NORTHSTAR
Horizon

 
Japanese advert. #3

TOSHIBA
HX-10

 
Primo advert #1

MICROKEY KFFT
PRIMO A-32

 
Advert

TANDY RADIO SHACK
TRS 80 MODEL 16

 
DAK advert (US, 1986...

VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
Visual 1083 / Commuter

 
French ad (dec. 1983...

SELCOM
Lemon II

 
8-page US advert #1

COMPAQ
Portable III

 
German brochure

ATARI
MEGA ST

 
First U.S. ad (1982)

BASIS
BASIS 108

 
1977 advert

IASIS
ia-7301

 
U.S. ad (1983)

FRANKLIN
ACE 1200

 
Brochure #2

BAINBRIDGE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, INC.
Dolphin

 
French ad (dec.1983)

AI ELECTRONICS
ai-M16

 
 Acorn ad #2

ACORN COMPUTER
BBC Master Compact

 
UK advert

TANDY RADIO SHACK
1000 HX

 
Advert

SEEQUA
CHAMELEON

 
1978 brochure #10

MSI
6800

 
U.S. ad. (1983)

COMPUPRO
System 816

 
PC-60

COMMODORE
PC Compatible systems

 

   LATEST COMMENTS
jason beck
8/1/2014
PANASONIC HHC
I have the entire set up of the hhc panasonic still in the brief case it came in. looking to sell it today. Program books and the instructions it was bought with. mint condition. no reasonable offer refused. questions and comments please email me. happy to show . it works . kil.liane@live.com

Stefano
7/29/2014
LITTON - MONROE OC-8880
http://home.online.no/~kr-lund/LittonMonroeOC8880.htm

The MESS project claims they need its ROM dump.
Pehaps the 2kb image in this link is useful ?

Martin
7/28/2014
VIDEO TECHNOLOGY  LASER 200 / 210
Yessss!
I just found one on eBay! And I won the auction!!

Fantastic!

Werner Augusto Roder Kai
7/26/2014
SONY  Hit-Bit 501
Please correct the information about this MSX

1 - in the Keyboard section: It''s HB-501F not HB-75F.
2 - Also Hitachi H2 and Sanyo PHC-34 have built-in tape recorders.

Also add: The A/V output is DIN-6 (non-standard), and it''s carry STEREO audio outputs.

Jack
7/21/2014
DAVID COMPUTER  PROFI 203
I just posted a bunch of information about the dAVID Computer, designed and built in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada in the early 1980''s. However, I got an error from this site when I submitted it. If there''s interest I can try again. - jc

memsom
7/21/2014
BE BeBox
If you really want a BeBox, I would go for the 133Mhz version. The 66Mhz version is too slow to run any version of BeOS very well. I owned a 66 for about 3 years, and it was a sad day when I let it go, but it was more or less useless to me by that point.

Darren
7/18/2014
PIONEER  Palcom PX-7
Hi Craig (in Australia)

I have 1 of the (off loaded) Pioneer PX-7 MSX Computers

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