Click Here to visit our Sponsor
The Latest News ! The History of Computing The Magazine Forums Collectors corner Have Fun there ! Buy books and goodies
  Click here to loginLogin Click here to send a link to this page to a friendTell a Friend     Search     Click here use the advanced search engine

Acorn Computer

Archimedes
A4000
Browse console museumBrowse pong museum








 

MSX Retro Gamer goodies !

see details
Apple II goodies !

see details
H.E.R.O. goodies !

see details
Amiga Workbench goodies !

see details
Back to the roots goodies !

see details
www.old-computers.com logo goodies !

see details
Commodore 64 boot screen goodies !

see details
Space Invaders goodies !

see details
READY prompt goodies !

see details
Space Invaders - Retro Gamer goodies !

see details
I love my Oric-1 goodies !

see details
1kb memory only...sorry goodies !

see details
Amstrad CPC-464 goodies !

see details
Pixel adventurer goodies !

see details
MZ-700 goodies !

see details
Atari ST bomb icons goodies !

see details
Commodore 64 goodies !

see details
Camputers Lynx logo goodies !

see details
ZX Spectrum goodies !

see details
Atari ST bee icon goodies !

see details
Destroy all humanoids ! goodies !

see details
Commodore VIC-20 goodies !

see details
Odyssey 2 / Videopac sprites goodies !

see details
Horace is not dead goodies !

see details
Oric Atmos goodies !

see details
Odyssey 2 / Videopac Select Game prompt goodies !

see details






  

- There are now 992 computers in the museum -




   LATEST ADDITIONS
OLIVETTI  A5
Olivetti introduced a mainframe about 1960 which was called ELEA, then in 1965 the Programma 101 - which was probably the world's first real desktop computer. Then a little later they introduced the Audiotronic range of "office computers". The first was the A770, which was replaced by the A7. The A5 was the desktop version. The Olivetti Audit 5 or A5 was largely an electro mechanical computer. It printed via a golf ball typewritter mechanism at the astonishing speed of 16 character per second...
TRIUMPH ADLER  TA-1600
The TA 1600 system was introduced in 1983 at the CeBIT (which was only a part of the "Hannover-Messe" by that time). TA showed a few sample applications and the 1600 family in general. Triumph Adler's hardware included also the 1600/20-3 which was supplied with a permanent-swap-HDD-unit. This unit had a memory/storage capacity of 2 x 8 MB (Winchester technology). Triumph Adler said the system (the 1600) will fit the demand of medium-sized businesses, due to the facts that these companies w...
MIDWICH Microcontroller
Called the Midwich Microcontroller, this British computer was developped to provide a small desktop micro capable of running other equipment throug a variety of interface cards. In 1979 an Italian IC manufacturer designed and began to sell a single board micro system that could be expanded to a full system with a VDU, discs, etc. Called the Nanocomputer, it was manufactured by SGS Ates and one of the distributors in the UK was Midwich. The Nano was somewhat expensive and suffered from a numbe...
RADIONIC Model R1001
This is an extremly rare TRS-80 Model 1 clone, based on an other clone: The Komtek 1 (from Germany). It's equiped with a Level II basic and powered by a Zilog Z80 cpu. _________ Contributors : Incog...
BASF 7100
The BASF 7000 systems are professional computers from Germany. They seem to be based on the Microterm II Intelligent Terminal by Digi-Log Systems, Inc. There were several models in the 7000 serie....
PERTEC PCC 2000
PCC 2000 is a professional computer released in 1978. It was designed in 1978 by Pertec, the company which merged with MITS by the end of 1976. The PCC is conceived as a monobloc machine, where the display and two 8" floppy disk drives are built-in the main case. The mechanical keyboard offers separated numeric and editing keypads. The system is powered by an Intel 8085 microprocessor and offers 64 KB RAM. The whole thing was apparently delivered with an extended Basic language, which has...
TERTA TAP-34
TAP 34 is a self design of Terta company from Hungary. Primarily it was designed as a terminal for big computer systems but it was also able to process data alone. The main integrated circuits were assembled in the USSR and in Hungary by Tungsram, but several parts were imported from other countries. The built-in monitor was a DME-28 monochrome CRT made by Orion. This company was famous for its televisions in Hungary and the other KGST countries. The floppy drive attached to the compute...
MCM COMPUTERS  MCM 800
Based on the MCM 70 / 700 (see this entry for more info), the MCM 800 followed in 1976. It was faster, included 16 KB RAM (instead of 8 KB for the 700), and included the ability to drive an external monitor. Among other things, MCM 800s were used in one of the first french industrial network called Gixinet (along with ARCnet). This was a token-bus type network developped by the Gixi company....
IMLAC PDS-1
The Imlac PDS-1 is a graphical minicomputer made by Imlac Corporation (founded in 1968) of Needham, Massachusetts. The PDS-1 debuted in 1970 and is considered to be the predecessor of all later graphical minicomputers and modern computer workstations. The PDS-1 had a built-in display list processor and 4096 16-bit words of core RAM. The PDS-1 used a vector display processor for displaying vector graphics as opposed to the raster graphics of modern computer displays. The PDS-1 was often used with...
COMMODORE  C64 Golden Jubilee
Between 1984 (in the U.S.) and 1986 (in Germany), Commodore International celebrated the 1,000,000 machines sold mark in these respective countries by issuing special "Gold" editions of the Commodore C64. These machines were regular C64 models, except they were Golden-colored and fixed on a commemorative plate. The following information comes from Death Adder : Until December 1986, 1,000,000 Commodore 64s were sold in Germany. On this occasion, Commodore Buromaschinen GmbH (...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
SBS  SBS 8000
The SBS 8000 is an early japanese system. The most remarkable feature of the SBS 8000 is its originaly shaped case. It looks like the keyboard had been placed in an area cut with a knife. There are in fact two models of the SBS 8000. The basic model has only 16k or 32k RAM and a Basic language built-in (Super-Basic). The 12" monochrome monitor sold with it, could display 16 x 64 characters. The Super Basic was 100% compatible with the one in the TRS-80 (only higher resolution with t...
RESEARCH MACHINES LINK 480Z
The Link 480Z was meant originally as a disc-less network station. It was designed to offer a lower cost computer to schools. The name "Link" meant link in a chain. It was a very reliable system, and one of the first personal computers used in the English schools. Because of the good reputation of the Research Machines computers, the Link 480Z was one of the three computers chosen for the U.K. 1982 Educational Scheme, with the Sinclair Spectrum and the
SHARP  X68000 Expert
The X68000 Expert is the successor of the X68000 Ace and Ace HD. It has 2 MB RAM. It was launched in the same time than the X68000 Pro and seems to have the same characteristics....
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS  Portable Professional Computer (PPC)
Basicaly, the TI PPC was the transportable version of the TI PC, with which it was entirely compatible. It was one of the few transportable systems to be available with an optional built-in color monitor, back in 1983. The standard version had a classic 9'' monochrome monitor built-in. Unfortunately the advantages of the PC Portable compared to IBM's offer was not obvious. It was not really compatible (IBM disks could be read, and that was basically all) and IBM expansion cards could not b...
RAIR MICROCOMPUTER Black Box
RAIR was a very early UK manufacturer of 8085-based systems and eventually licensed its designs to ICL. This obscure system was sold with a hard-disk and a 5"1/4 disk-drive built-in. It was conceived to be used as a multi-user system. The following languages were available : Basic, Cobol, Fortran, Pascal, PL/1. More information about Black Box internal hardware in the ICL Personal computer page. Pictured here is a model 3/30. ______________________...
COMMODORE  AMIGA 3000
The Commodore Amiga 3000 is the successor of the Amiga 2500 (itself a successor of the Amiga 2000). It was replaced three years later with the Amiga 4000. Amiga Interactive Guide description : The A3000 is a powerhouse in comparison to previous Amiga, it was sold as a high-end graphics workstation. For a time it was u...
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION DE 68DT
Software for this system includes the debugger (in ROM), a BASIC interpreter, a FORTRAN compiler and a linker. The ROM debugger features interactive translation of assembly language mnemonics, tape, disk and printer commands and multiple breakpoints. The system was available in two configurations : the DEC68 DT (pictured above) which includes a FDD, and the DEC68 C which fits into a smaller case without the FDD. It was priced from $2000....
TELEVIDEO  TS-803
The TS-803 succeeded to the TS-802. Although it was basically the same CP/M machine, it had several notable enhancements. The all-in-one case had an innovative design. The main unit and mass storage devices were mounted vertically at the right side of a large tilting 14" green display (at the time the standard size was of 12"). The keyboard was also greatly improved. It offered 16 programmable function keys and 10 pre-programmed text-editing keys. It was...
SOUTH WEST TECHNICAL PRODUCTS CORPORATION S/09
The SWTPC S/09 system was the second computer of the brand based on the Motorola 6809 microprocessor, said to be the most powerful 8-bits general purpose MPU available. As with the first 6809 version, it used the SS-50 version bus. The S/O9 system had a 20-bit adress bus. It was able to address up to 768 Kb. of memory and used dynamic address translation to map 4K pages into the 64K address space of the microprocessor. The system could be used as a multi-user/multitasking platform. It wa...
ICE-FELIX HC-2000
The HC-2000 was an upgraded version of the HC-91+. It was also compatible with the Sinclair Spectrum but could run as well the CP/M operating system and all its associated software. It was actually an HC-91 with internal disk interface and 3.5" floppy disk drive. Major hardware differences were a white larger case housing the floppy drive, and 64 KB of RAM of which 48 KB were available in Spectrum mode, and 56 KB in CP/M mode. ...

   RANDOM ADVERTS
French ad (jan. 1980...

DATA SOFT
PCS 80

 
U.K. ad. 1984

CW/P
Cortex

 
French ad (dec. 1987...

COMMODORE
Amiga 500

 
French advert (1983)

SANYO
PHC 25

 
French advert

CANON
V-20

 
Advert

COMMODORE
C64

 
Argentinian advert

CZERWENY
CZ-2000

 
German advert (1983)

C.ITOH
YD-8110

 
Last +4 sales, Apr. ...

COMMODORE
PLUS 4 - C232/264/364

 
UK advert, Oct. 1983

MATTEL ELECTRONICS
Aquarius

 
End of life

TRIUMPH ADLER
ALPHATRONIC PC

 
French advert

OLYMPIA
BOSS

 
French advert (septe...

HEATHKIT / ZENITH
Z-100/110/120

 
U.S. ad (1983)

ALTOS COMPUTER SYSTEMS
Serie 5

 
Advert #1

COMMODORE
VIC 20

 
US ad. 1983 #2

KAYPRO
Kaypro II

 
Brochure extract

CASIO
FX-9000P

 
Apple Business Graph...

APPLE
APPLE II

 
English poster

OSBORNE CORP.
OSBORNE 1

 
Xerox range, August ...

XEROX
6085

 
U.K. ad. (1986)

ATARI
520 / 1040 STf / STfm

 
Dutch advert

COMMODORE
PET 2001

 
Lucas Logic brochure

LUCAS
Nascom 3

 
French ad #1

BASIS
BASIS 108

 

   LATEST COMMENTS
Chris Jordan
4/19/2014
ACORN COMPUTER  BBC Master
David wrote: "the BBC B used the IC18 Sound Generator and the BBC Master the IC38 which offered the same number of channels (4) but slightly better quality sound. ... the BBC B+ also used the IC38!"

David, ICXX is simply Acorn''s own designation for the position of the IC in the circuit. What identifies the Sound Generator is the manufacturer''s part number - SN76496 in the Model B and B+, and the SN76489 in the Master. There is no difference in the sound output quality between these two chips.

By the way, are you the David Shepherd who wrote Atom Minotaur? I''m the Chris Jordan who designed the sound firmware driving the above chips in the BBC Micro.

Andrew Reid
4/16/2014
NORTHSTAR  Advantage
I may have some old Creative computing NorthStar Horizon information if any body is interested $$ Also has any body got an electronic copy of the program "What''s IT"

jaime
4/15/2014
MICRODIGITAL TK-83
Do you still have one the sell? I had one as a kid and would love to own one again :D

jaime
4/15/2014
MICRODIGITAL TK-83
Do you still have one the sell? I had one as a kid and would love to own one again :D

Mikael
4/14/2014
ACORN COMPUTER  ATOM
I have found a Emulator of Acorn Atom, and printed out an manual to. So it''s gone be nice Basic programming.

I like to program Basic, but I''ll need manuals so I know how the Basic language work out. And what I can see so was Acorn Atom a good computer, the Basic is easy to understand.

Anton
4/13/2014
ICE-FELIX HC-85
The price was 14.000, that$s mean 1120$ in that times

Mikael
4/13/2014
ACORN COMPUTER  Electron
I only now got some Electron Emulators, but in old days did I have an Texas Instrument TI994A. And a Lambda 8300, then a Commodore 64. But I sold them after a while, I am very interested in programming Basic.

Click here to go to the top of the page   
Contact us | members | about old-computers.com | donate old-systems | FAQ
OLD-COMPUTERS.COM is hosted by - NYI (New York Internet) -