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- There are now 992 computers in the museum -




   LATEST ADDITIONS
OLIVETTI  A5
Olivetti introduced a mainframe about 1960 which was called ELEA, then in 1965 the Programma 101 - which was probably the world's first real desktop computer. Then a little later they introduced the Audiotronic range of "office computers". The first was the A770, which was replaced by the A7. The A5 was the desktop version. The Olivetti Audit 5 or A5 was largely an electro mechanical computer. It printed via a golf ball typewritter mechanism at the astonishing speed of 16 character per second...
TRIUMPH ADLER  TA-1600
The TA 1600 system was introduced in 1983 at the CeBIT (which was only a part of the "Hannover-Messe" by that time). TA showed a few sample applications and the 1600 family in general. Triumph Adler's hardware included also the 1600/20-3 which was supplied with a permanent-swap-HDD-unit. This unit had a memory/storage capacity of 2 x 8 MB (Winchester technology). Triumph Adler said the system (the 1600) will fit the demand of medium-sized businesses, due to the facts that these companies w...
MIDWICH Microcontroller
Called the Midwich Microcontroller, this British computer was developped to provide a small desktop micro capable of running other equipment throug a variety of interface cards. In 1979 an Italian IC manufacturer designed and began to sell a single board micro system that could be expanded to a full system with a VDU, discs, etc. Called the Nanocomputer, it was manufactured by SGS Ates and one of the distributors in the UK was Midwich. The Nano was somewhat expensive and suffered from a numbe...
RADIONIC Model R1001
This is an extremly rare TRS-80 Model 1 clone, based on an other clone: The Komtek 1 (from Germany). It's equiped with a Level II basic and powered by a Zilog Z80 cpu. _________ Contributors : Incog...
BASF 7100
The BASF 7000 systems are professional computers from Germany. They seem to be based on the Microterm II Intelligent Terminal by Digi-Log Systems, Inc. There were several models in the 7000 serie....
PERTEC PCC 2000
PCC 2000 is a professional computer released in 1978. It was designed in 1978 by Pertec, the company which merged with MITS by the end of 1976. The PCC is conceived as a monobloc machine, where the display and two 8" floppy disk drives are built-in the main case. The mechanical keyboard offers separated numeric and editing keypads. The system is powered by an Intel 8085 microprocessor and offers 64 KB RAM. The whole thing was apparently delivered with an extended Basic language, which has...
TERTA TAP-34
TAP 34 is a self design of Terta company from Hungary. Primarily it was designed as a terminal for big computer systems but it was also able to process data alone. The main integrated circuits were assembled in the USSR and in Hungary by Tungsram, but several parts were imported from other countries. The built-in monitor was a DME-28 monochrome CRT made by Orion. This company was famous for its televisions in Hungary and the other KGST countries. The floppy drive attached to the compute...
MCM COMPUTERS  MCM 800
Based on the MCM 70 / 700 (see this entry for more info), the MCM 800 followed in 1976. It was faster, included 16 KB RAM (instead of 8 KB for the 700), and included the ability to drive an external monitor. Among other things, MCM 800s were used in one of the first french industrial network called Gixinet (along with ARCnet). This was a token-bus type network developped by the Gixi company....
IMLAC PDS-1
The Imlac PDS-1 is a graphical minicomputer made by Imlac Corporation (founded in 1968) of Needham, Massachusetts. The PDS-1 debuted in 1970 and is considered to be the predecessor of all later graphical minicomputers and modern computer workstations. The PDS-1 had a built-in display list processor and 4096 16-bit words of core RAM. The PDS-1 used a vector display processor for displaying vector graphics as opposed to the raster graphics of modern computer displays. The PDS-1 was often used with...
COMMODORE  C64 Golden Jubilee
Between 1984 (in the U.S.) and 1986 (in Germany), Commodore International celebrated the 1,000,000 machines sold mark in these respective countries by issuing special "Gold" editions of the Commodore C64. These machines were regular C64 models, except they were Golden-colored and fixed on a commemorative plate. The following information comes from Death Adder : Until December 1986, 1,000,000 Commodore 64s were sold in Germany. On this occasion, Commodore Buromaschinen GmbH (...

   RANDOM SYSTEMS
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION DE 68DT
Software for this system includes the debugger (in ROM), a BASIC interpreter, a FORTRAN compiler and a linker. The ROM debugger features interactive translation of assembly language mnemonics, tape, disk and printer commands and multiple breakpoints. The system was available in two configurations : the DEC68 DT (pictured above) which includes a FDD, and the DEC68 C which fits into a smaller case without the FDD. It was priced from $2000....
SINCLAIR  ZX 81
The Sinclair ZX 81 was the successor of the ZX 80, and can be regarded as an evolution of it. The ZX80 could not handle floating point numbers or cassette data files, but the ZX-81 could. The ZX-80 had 4k ROM : the ZX-81 had 8K ROM with 30 additional functions and some instructions to drive the printer. Thanks to a higher level of integrations (the total number of chips in the basic system was 4, against the ZX80's 21), the ZX-81 cost Ł30 less than the ZX-80. ...
COMMODORE  AMIGA 3000
The Commodore Amiga 3000 is the successor of the Amiga 2500 (itself a successor of the Amiga 2000). It was replaced three years later with the Amiga 4000. Amiga Interactive Guide description : The A3000 is a powerhouse in comparison to previous Amiga, it was sold as a high-end graphics workstation. For a time it was u...
EPSON  QX 10
The QX-10 was a robust small business computer that used tried and tested technology rather than anything too innovative. Nevertheless, it was designed to be complete in itself for both hardware and software. It had an enhanced keyboard with 10 function keys and up to 16 fonts can be defined. It had a battery to save clock, date and a small 2048 characters buffer. It could use MS-DOS programs thanks to an optional 8088 card. Byte magazine said in January 1983: ...
RCA Cosmac VIP
The Cosmac VIP, originaly named VP-111, is a typical hobbyist "single-board" computer sold as a kit. You had to build it yourself ! The system uses a RCA CDP-1802 microprocessor like the RCA Studio II video game system. In fact the Studio II is very similar to the VIP and can be considered as its video-game version. But the VIP is also somehow an improved version of the original Cosmac Elf board system, described in Popular Electronics magazine, august 76 an...
TIMEX / SINCLAIR 1500
The Timex-Sinclair 1500 is basicaly a Sinclair ZX-81 in a ZX Spectrum case with 16 KB RAM. Timex marketed the Sinclair computers on the North American market. The ZX-81 was sold as the TS-1000 (with 2 KB RAM instead of 1 KB of the original model) and the ZX Spectrum as the forth-coming TS-2000 (which remained a prototype). As the sales of the TS-1000 were dangerously falling, Timex produced a mi...
PROCESSOR TECHNOLOGY CORP  SOL - 10 / 20
The Sol Computer was developed by Bob Marsh, Lee Felsenstein and Gordon French. Bob founded his company, Processor Technology, in April 1975 making 4K RAM memory boards for the Altair (cause MITS couldn't make a working memory board) In June 1975, Bob and Les Solomon (technical editor of Popular Electronics) dreamed up the Sol-20 computer, Bob had a bunch of cheap walnut that he originally intented to use in a digital clock, he didn't want it to go to waste and used it in the Sol-20 (see pict...
THOMSON  TO 7 / 70
The TO-7/70 was presented alongside the MO5, in march 1984. While the MO-5 represents a small break into the TO-7 philosophy, the TO-7/70 follows and enhances the TO-7 features. The case of the TO-7/70 is almost the same as the TO-7 one : roughly triangular with sharp edges. The keyboard, though made of rubber keys, is an improvement over the flat membrane keyboard of the TO-7. The keyboard layout is AZERTY which is normal...
ACORN COMPUTER  Archimedes A3010
The Acorn Archimedes A3000 was replaced by the Acorn A3010 and A3020, two simililar but slightly different models, aimed at the home and educational market. See common features text in A3020 page. For the first time, the A3010 was sold in electrical retail stores, next to the Amiga A1200 and Atari Falcon 030, as well as 486 class PCs which where starting to become popular in UK homes. The Acorn A3010 had two Atari style joystick ports, green functi...
AMPERE  WS 1
This was a very unique system with an extraordinary design. It was conceived by Ampere and produced by Nippon-Shingo in 1985. Sadly, it failed the US FCC certification tests and so was not available on the US market, which helps explain why it is so rare nowadays (along with its high price and narrow-targeted market)... One of the main characteristics of the Ampere WS-1 was the use of the APL programming language : an interpreted language extremely synthetic and very rich. APL ...

   RANDOM ADVERTS
French advert (1983)

SANYO
PHC 25

 
Newburry brochure #1

GRUNDY
NEW BRAIN

 
1978 brochure #1

MSI
6800

 
US ad. June 1983

DYNALOGIC
HYPERION

 
french advert (jan. ...

EACA
VIDEO GENIE 1 / EG-3003

 
U.S. Advert #2 (1979...

APPLE
APPLE II

 
US advert, Jul 1985

AMPERE
WS 1

 
First ad.

COLUMBIA DATA PRODUCTS
VP

 
Memory board

VECTOR GRAPHICS
Vector 1

 
First advert

MITS
ALTAIR 8800

 
German brochure #1

ATARI
TT 030

 
In schools #2

BULL
MICRAL 80/22

 
Proud !

THORN EMI
WREN

 
First advert - Jan.1...

IBM
PC - Model 5150

 
French advert (1981)

TANDY RADIO SHACK
TRS 80 MODEL II

 
Newbrain brochure

GRUNDY
NEW BRAIN

 
German ad #2

SHARP
MZ 700

 
New Zealand ad. (198...

APPLE
APPLE II

 
Advert #2

PRAVETZ
IMKO-1/2 & Pravetz 82

 
New Zealand advert  ...

MITS
Altair 8800b

 
IBM T-shirt

IBM
PC AT

 
French ad #1

BASIS
BASIS 108

 
Advert #1

SMT
Goupil 3

 
U.S. advert (1977) #...

POLYMORPHIC
POLY 88

 

   LATEST COMMENTS
Jack
7/21/2014
DAVID COMPUTER  PROFI 203
I just posted a bunch of information about the dAVID Computer, designed and built in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada in the early 1980''s. However, I got an error from this site when I submitted it. If there''s interest I can try again. - jc

memsom
7/21/2014
BE BeBox
If you really want a BeBox, I would go for the 133Mhz version. The 66Mhz version is too slow to run any version of BeOS very well. I owned a 66 for about 3 years, and it was a sad day when I let it go, but it was more or less useless to me by that point.

Darren
7/18/2014
PIONEER  Palcom PX-7
Hi Craig (in Australia)

I have 1 of the (off loaded) Pioneer PX-7 MSX Computers

Mark
7/18/2014
TOMY  Tutor MK II
There''''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

Mark
7/18/2014
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS  TI 99 / 4A Beige
There''''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

Mark
7/18/2014
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS  TI 99 / 2
There''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

Mark
7/18/2014
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS  TI 99 / 4A
There''''s an interesting site about TMS99xx stuff :

http://www.avjd51.dsl.pipex.com/

Has quite a lot of stuff on the TI TMS9900/TMS9995 hardware including a breadboard self-build computer based on the TMS9995

Well worth a look !

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