Click Here to visit our Sponsor
The Latest News ! The History of Computing The Magazine Have Fun there ! Buy books and goodies
  Click here to loginLogin Click here to print the pagePrinter ViewClick here to send a link to this page to a friendTell a FriendTell us what you think about this pageRate this PageMistake ? You have mr info ? Click here !Add Info     Search     Click here use the advanced search engine
Browse console museumBrowse pong museum









 

C64 maze generator T-shirts!

see details
Ready prompt T-shirts!

see details
Spiral program T-shirts!

see details
BASIC code T-shirts!

see details
Pixel Deer T-shirts!

see details
Pak Pak Monster T-shirts!

see details
Breakout T-shirts!

see details
Vector ship T-shirts!

see details
Shooting gallery T-shirts!

see details
Pixel adventure T-shirts!

see details





I > INTEL > Intellec Series   


Intel
Intellec Series

The Intellec Microcomputer Development Systems (MDS) were complete computers intended for the development of Intel microcomputer based products. They included a main unit with CPU, RAM, ROM, I/O and interrupt circuitry, as well as all necessary software: Assembler, linker, debugger.

Optional EPROM programmer and In-Circuit Emulator (ICE) allowed real-time emulation and diagnostics into user configured system before saving final program into an EPROM.

Intellec 4 and 8

The 4 was first Intellec Model, introduced in 1973. It was intended for software development for the 4004, first Intel 4-bit processor. We have few information about it, apart from an user memories:
This helped but it didn't really cut down that much on development time.
Loading the assembler took *only* about 30 minutes. While for the program I was working on took almost an hour for each pass and the assembler was three passes (generate symbol table, punch machine code onto teletype paper tape punch, print assembler listing on teletype).


The same year, Intel also lauched the Intellec 8 for the 8008, first Intel 8-bit processor.

Intellec MDS

The Intellec MDS was launched in (about) 1975. It featured an 8080 processor and could implement MCS-80 (8080) based computers and Intel Series 3000 systems.

The main unit needed a Serial video terminal or an ASR-33 Teletype to be connected, as well as a paper tape puncher/reader and/or floppy drive unit.

Siemens sold in Germany a local version of the first Intellec called SME-800.

Series II

The Intellec series II Model 230 included a 2000 character CRT, a detachable full ASCII keyboard and dual double-density 8" diskette drives providing over 1 MB of data storage.

ISIS-II Diskette Operating Software allowed the Model 230 to be used for assembly and/or compilation and debugging of programs for Intel's MSC-80 (8080), MCS-85 (8085) or MCS-48 (8048) microprocessor families. ISIS also supported FORTRAN and PL/M languages.

For further information, you can refer to the Siemens SME system which was the German version of the Intellec Series 2

Series III

As Intel's customers upgraded their designs from the 8085 to the 8086, Intel upgraded its 'Intellec' development system from Series-2 to Series-3 by plugging in a new 16 bit board called "RPA-86" (Resident Processor Assembly) with 8086 CPU and 16 bit wide RAM and ROM.

The Series-3 boots up in 8 bit mode with the 8085 running under ISIS-2 like before, but when 16 bit software has to be executed, then the 8085 hands over the control to this new board which becomes bus master, and the rest of the Intellec MDS just serves as an I/O subsystem.

Thanks to Gottfried Silberhorn for information and pictures.

_______________________

Further information from Colin Douglas Howell:
By mid-1974, Intel had renamed the Intellec 8 to the Intellec 8/Mod 8. The 8080 had just been introduced, and it seems the system was renamed to distinguish it from the Intellec 8/Mod 80, which was for 8080 development. (This second system is sometimes called the Intellec 8/80, following the logo on the front panel. I suppose the original system might also be called the Intellec 8/08 or 8/8, but the only pictures I've seen all show the same "Intellec 8" logo.)
The 4040, an improved successor to the 4004, was also introduced in 1974. The Intellec 4/Mod 40 (Intellec 4/40), which was 4040-based, was probably introduced around this time. I would assume that Intel renamed the Intellec 4 to the Intellec 4/Mod 4, just as they had done to the Intellec 8.




ShareThis


 

I have one of these 8080 systems, working when last powered up (maybe 10 years now), missing EPROM programmer board, converted from 20mA to RS232, 110VAC, all manuals.
As I have lost my workshop (turned into nursary) I need to get rid of this and some others, free to a good home, heavy so postage maybe costly.
Drop me an email if u want it.

          
Wednesday 31st January 2007
Callum (Edinburgh / UK)

 

NAME  Intellec Series
MANUFACTURER  Intel
TYPE  Professional Computer
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1973
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  ROM monitor
KEYBOARD  Full-stroke 62 keys managed by an Intel 8741 processor (II) (III)
CPU  Intel 8080 (I) - 8085 (II) - 8086 (III)
SPEED  2 MHz (I) - 4 MHz (II) - 5 MHz (III)
CO-PROCESSOR  Intel 8080 I/O dedicated (II) (III)
RAM  Up to 64 KB (I) (II) - 128 KB (III)
ROM  2 KB Boot ROM + 2 KB Monitor (II) - 16 KB (III)
TEXT MODES  80 columns x 25 rows (video terminal)
GRAPHIC MODES  Text only
COLORS  Monochrome
I/O PORTS  Multibus expansion slot, Serial port, 24-bit Parallel port
BUILT IN MEDIA  8'' floppy drive, 80 or 160 KB each (II) (III)
OS  ISIS operating system
POWER SUPPLY  Built-in power supply unit
PERIPHERALS  EPROM programmer; In-Circuit Emulator
PRICE  Expensive!


retro computing t-shirts and goodies
3D Cubes
BASIC code
Breakout
C64 maze generator
Pak Pak Monster
Pixel adventure
Pixel Deer
Ready prompt
Shooting gallery
Spiral program
Vector ship

Related Ebay auctions in real time - click to buy yours







 
Click here to go to the top of the page   
Contact us | members | about old-computers.com | donate old-systems | FAQ
OLD-COMPUTERS.COM is hosted by - NYI (New York Internet) -