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A > APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES  > Microbee 128   


APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES   Applied Technologies
Microbee 128

The Microbee computers were popular in Australia where they equipped many schools. But these computers also sold well in Scandinavia or Sweden for example.

The Microbee 128 and its extended version, the Premium series, were housed in the same case as the Microbee 32 but had four additional cursor keys. they shipped with a 5.25" or 3.5" single or double disk drives unit.

Both 128 and Premium versions boasted improved graphics over the earlier machines, colour as standard and many other detailed improvements. They ran CP/M operating system. The Premium had an IBM CGA compatible video interface and dual density floppy drives, offering 776 KB capacity instead of 386 KB for the 128. a 10 MB hard disk was also available.

Special thanks to Norm Poulter from Australia who donated us this computer !

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Being equipped with a Z80 CPU, these "128K" units could only access 64KB for programs and data. The other 64KB was set aside as a RAM drive. The RAM drive wasn''t all that useful though, because (unlike their 32 and 64K models) they used DRAM not SRAM, so the RAM drive data was gone once the computer was switched off.

          
Sunday 29th November 2015
Michael Otway (Australia)

Heh, Kung Fury gets hacked back in time on one of these. :D

          
Friday 29th May 2015
Charles Thomas

The Network you describe was very popular in schools here in Australia also. It was called StarNet, and in it's most common configuration could support up to 30 or so client machines. It was a 19,200 baud serial network, the client machines having "StarNet Adapters" while the server was generally a 56k disk system model with a "StarNetwork Multiplexer". Software would be loaded on the server, then "pushed" through the serial link to the client computers and run from their RAM. Some units would have a "battery" switch so you could plug in, load software, then unplug and keep it in memory while you moved the machine elsewhere.

          
Sunday 8th August 2004
Peter Larsen (Sydney, Australia)
Buzz Computers

 

NAME  Microbee 128
MANUFACTURER  Applied Technologies
TYPE  Home Computer
ORIGIN  Australia
YEAR  1984
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  None
KEYBOARD  QWERTY 64-key full-stroke keyboard with arrow keys
CPU  Z80A
SPEED  3.375 MHz
RAM  128 KB
VRAM  16 KB
ROM  4 KB BIOS + 4 KB FDD controller
TEXT MODES  64 x 16 (Microbee BASIC) - 80 x 24 (CP/M
GRAPHIC MODES  512 x 256 (2 colours), 128 x 48 (16 colours)
COLORS  16
SOUND  Built-in 1 canal loudspeaker
SIZE / WEIGHT  35.5 (W) x 23 (D) x 5.5 (H) cm
I/O PORTS  Power/Video/tape, Expansion/drive Interface, Serial ,Parallel, RGB, Optional user ports
BUILT IN MEDIA  Dual 5.25''Single Sided Drives (386 KB) or 3.5'' DS/SD (776 KB)
OS  CP/M 2.2
POWER SUPPLY  Switching PSU built-in the FDD unit
PERIPHERALS  EPROM programmer
PRICE  Unknown


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