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PC 8401A
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C > COMMODORE  > PET 2001     


Commodore
PET 2001

The Commodore PET 2001 was a very successful machine. Four models were made: early 4KB models, the PET 2001-8N with 8 KB RAM, PET 2001-16N with 16 KB RAM and the PET 2001-32N with 32K RAM. This mchine was conceived by Chuck Peddle who later joined Tandon, a drive manufacturer.

Trivia from Dave Lundberg:
The static RAMs in the early 2001's got so hot that they would often "crawl" up out of their sockets over time. The "official" solution? Re-seat the chips and put a nylon wire tye under the socket and over the chip to hold it snuggly in place.
More trivia: Microsoft "quietly" wrote the BASIC used in the 40-column PETs. Proof? Type: wait 6502, 10 and "MICROSOFT!" will be printed on the display 10 times.


Guy Tailor reports:
(99% sure this is true...). The following app will cause the Pet 2001 to catch fire!!!
10 motor 1
20 motor 0
30 goto 10
It turns the tape motor on and off so quickly, it overheats and... flames!! :-)


Alan R Morris answers:
Guy Tailor's report is probably untrue as it was generally known that it was impossible to damage the original PETs by any programming, including fast, (if fast is the right word) POKEs. I've never heard of the keyword 'motor' in any of the 'toolkit' ROMs that I've used.
Even flipping bit 3 of $E813 on and off, which would turn motor 1 on and off, would probably not cause it to catch fire. Especially as the IRQ service routine would normally turn off the tape motors, unless the status flag for the cassette was poked to a non-zero value.


Ian Callow adds:
Guy Tailor's program actually relates to the BBC Micro & Acorn Electron. The PET did not have a "motor" command. In any event, all it did on the BBC was burn out the motor relay.

More details from Frank Leonhardt:
it's an 'urban myth' which was made up about the BBC Micro. However, it was based on a true story about the PET - there was a location you could poke to do with the graphics frequency which if you set it wrong could cause the HT supply in the monitor way over-voltage, which would sometimes break down the transformer. This came up in the PCW magazine* after someone wrote "it is impossible to damage a computer with bad software".

* Frank was the first Technical Editor for the famous Personal Computer World magazine, England's (Europe's) biggest computer magazine - founded in 1978.


Alexander Pierson reports:
Chuck Peddle himself said that despite the official name, the Personal Electronic Transactor, is not what it is really named for. From seeing the Pet Rock fad take off, Chuck thought "if this guy can make 15 bucks or so from selling a rock, then if this computer is named like it, the PET should surely succeed."

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I''ve got a PET2001 with the 8050 duel drive with the printer. My question is ,is the printer worth much? Haven''t seen any on line anywhere.

          
Monday 1st October 2012
Dave  (US)

Got a bit of a story about the 2001-8. I got the opportunity to work in a lab that had an aging Friden EC-132 (first RPN calculator was EC-130). At that time I saw an advertisement in the back pages of Scientific American for this Commodor computer. I convinced my superior that with a bit of programming I could make the Pet replace the Friden. I did mention that I had only taken one introductory course in Fortran at college but Basic was similar to Fortran, so I was told. Also mentioned that since a card used up about 100 bytes we should go for the 8k version. Anyway Pet was purchased and I wrote the program which provided a bit larger stack but no better precision. I also added several other features but in all a success, my first at programming. Needless to say I ended up writing a lot more programs and left Chemistry far back in the rear view mirror.

          
Sunday 29th January 2012
Dean (USA)

My first computer, the 8K version with the insane chicklet keyboard. When I finally brought it home, I couldn''t plug it in the wall ''cause my father''s house had groundless duplexes. I had to go to a neighbour and get a "modern" duplex to replace the one in my bedroom. Then I sat at that keyboard for 24 hours straight! No, I did not become a programmer. But I still stay up all night, hell, I''m typing this at 01:00 in the morning...

          
Saturday 27th August 2011
Stephen Young (Vancouver / Canada)

 

NAME  PET 2001
MANUFACTURER  Commodore
TYPE  Professional Computer
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1977
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  Commodore Basic 1.0
KEYBOARD  73 key 'chicklet' keyboard with numeric keypad
CPU  6502
SPEED  1 mHz
RAM  4 KB (early version) then 8 KB
VRAM  1 KB
ROM  14 KB
TEXT MODES  40 x 25
GRAPHIC MODES  None
COLOrsc  Monochrome
I/O PORTS  IEEE 488, Parallel port, second, ''user port'' for 8-bit I/O, cassette port inside the case, rarely used
BUILT IN MEDIA  tape recorder
POWER SUPPLY  Built-in power supply unit
PRICE  £700 (8 KB RAM - 1978)





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