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A > APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES  > Computer In a Book   


APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES   Applied Technologies
Computer In a Book

The Computer-In-A-Book (CIAB) was released just after the Microbee 64. This strange machine was composed of one main unit and at least two 'books'.

The computer was actually not in a book, but in the main unit, a Microbee 64. The first book held the user manual in a ring binder, the second book (Vol. 1) held a - new at the time - 3.5" floppy-disk drive and a power supply unit which supplied the main unit and the drive. This unit could also supply a second slave disk-book (Vol. 2).

The designer's idea was to offer a low-cost and expandable CP/M machine. Up to 4 disk-books could be connected in chain. Even though the idea was original, the day-to-day use of these light units wasn't very convenient. The bad idea was to mount them in a bookcase, between other books, causing PSU to overheat and system failure.

We need more info about this computer ! If you designed, used, or have more info about this system, please send us pictures or anything you might find useful.
Special thanks to Norm Poulter from Australia who donated us this computer !

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There are two of these on display at the Melbourne Museum, hooked up to a 'bee, that Andrew and I saw a while back.

          
Saturday 23rd July 2005
Andrew Wright (Australie)
The Little Droid

Ah, yes, the Microbee C-I-A-B. my dad and his brother Grahame were the founders of what turned into the microbee user's group. good times, says dad. back when most computers had memory measured in kilobytes instead of gigabytes. i still have some older computers my dad owned, like a Toshiba T-1100 Plus......

andrew

          
Saturday 30th October 2004
Andrew (Australia)

 

NAME  Computer In a Book
MANUFACTURER  Applied Technologies
TYPE  Professional Computer
ORIGIN  Australia
YEAR  1985
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  None
KEYBOARD  Typewriter type, 60 keys
CPU  Z80A
SPEED  3.375 MHz
CO-PROCESSOR  6545 video controller
RAM  64 KB
VRAM  Unknown
ROM  4 KB BIOS + 4 KB FDD controller
TEXT MODES  64 x 16 (Microbee BASIC) - 80 x 24 (CP/M)
GRAPHIC MODES  128 x 48, 512 x 256 dots
COLORS  Black & white
SOUND  Built-in loudspeaker, one channel, 2 octaves
SIZE / WEIGHT  35.5 (W) x 23 (D) x 5.5 (H) cm / 1.5 kg (main unit)
I/O PORTS  Power/Video/tape, Expansion/drive Interface, Serial ,Parallel, RGB, user ports
BUILT IN MEDIA  1 to 4 3.5'' book-floppy-disk drives
OS  CP/M
POWER SUPPLY  Switching PSU in the FDD book
PERIPHERALS  Modem
PRICE  About $1,600


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