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M > MICROWRITER > Microwriter     


MICROWRITER
Microwriter

Microwriter was not really a computer, but a very original pocket word processing system, designed in 1980 by Endfield Cie in the USA and later manufactured in the UK. It used a keyboard with only 6 keys which made it possible to keyboard all the alphabet letters, numerals and punctuation marks. The typing method used the letters shape likeness and only one hand was necessary to type text. It only required a few hours to get used to keyboard and then typing speed could be very fast.

The internal design of MicroWriter was similar to a pocket calculator with low power components and rechargeable batteries ensuring a 30 hours autonomy. The 14 character LCD display allowed horizontal text scrolling. Several editing controls made it possible to correct, remove, add and move text.
The integral word processing software could connect directly to a printer and did formatting. It also allowed to upload/download documents to a computer via that same serial port.

Microwriter could be also connected to a video monitor via an external unit, and an acoustic modem. The text could be recorded as well on tape.

The original concept of Microwriter did not meet much success, and distribution stopped in 1985, though the keyboard was subsequently used on the AgendA (1988-93) and still available for PC & Palm as the CyKey from Bellaire Electronics.

_______________________

Gareth Powell writes us:
It is much more interesting, perhaps, than you suggest.
The inventor was Cy Enfield. He was blacklisted in America in the film industry and went to Britain.
He wrote the script for Zulu Dawn about 1969 and then wrote, produced and directed Zulu in 1964. That starred Jack Hawkins, Michael Caine (at his very best) and Stanley Baker. The narrration, incidentally, was by Richard Burton so we are talking a class act.
I never met Cy Enflield but I met his daughter several times in London.

While working on the script of Zulu Dawn and later on Zulu he had the idea of a one handed keyboard. He designed it, it was produced and I bought one.
It was indeed called the Microwriter. It had five buttons on the top and you pressed them in sequence. I could write articles with the machine while driving and then sling the result down through a serial port into my computer for editing.
The reason it did not sell is that it simply was very, very slow. There is a lot of current research into similar machines. And they won't work either. Speed and convenience is what you need and such devices provide neither.


Stan Lee adds:
The MicroWriter was actually developed by a company called Bellaire electronics... Their other product is called a CyKey, which allowed people to use the MicroWriting system as a keyboard on their PCs. The original model - Model CK A 1.1 - only used a 5-pinny outlet for the BBC Micro computer, however newer models allow you to use it with Microsoft Operating Systems.

Lynn Craig's memories:
I was National Information Officer for the Microelectronics Education Programme during the early 1980s. All directorate staff used the Microwriter to compose all correspondence. We travelled with the machines as we visited the 14 regional information centres on a regular basis. On such long trips we could write on the train or whilst sitting in airports. It was mindbending to learn, but after 7 days we were each very competent and thought it a marvellous machine.
I still have mine. I was once surrounded by some aggressive young people whilst travelling alone in a first class compartment, and I defused their threatening behaviour by teaching them how to use the machine.


ShareThis


 

I have a Microwriter MW4 that has many fond memories. If anybody would like this classic piece of early technology let me know and I will send along for the cost of post and packing. Hate to throw it away. Serial No. 32233. Can email me info-''at''-chaos-works.com

          
Friday 13rd July 2012
Gregory (London)
gregory sams - cultural change agent and author

I have 2 Microwriter Agendas (32K) for disposal. Complete with User Guides and Learn to Microwrite booklet. Also a French card and a Maths and Finance card, chargers, slip cases, one leather wallet and a parallel cable (for connection to PC). I want rid of the lot - either as one or two units. They have only been used as demo models and I guess the batteries have had it.

          
Thursday 8th February 2007
Neville Dalton (Newbury UK)

Does anyone have a schematic diagram for the MW 4?

          
Saturday 21st October 2006
Ian (Newbury, England)

 

NAME  Microwriter
MANUFACTURER  Microwriter
TYPE  Pocket
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1980
END OF PRODUCTION  1985
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  Word processing
KEYBOARD  6 keys
CPU  RCA CDP1802 (COSMAC) the first capable CMOS processor
RAM  8 Kb. expandable to 16 Kb.
ROM  Unknown
TEXT MODES  14 characters LCD display
GRAPHIC MODES  none
COLOrsc  none
SOUND  none
SIZE / WEIGHT  Unknown
I/O PORTS  Serial, Expansion, Tape recorder
BUILT IN MEDIA  none
OS  n
POWER SUPPLY  Rechargeable batteries or external P.S.U.
PERIPHERALS  Video monitor module
PRICE  Unknown





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