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T > TOMY  > Tutor / Pyuuta     


Tomy
Tutor / Pyuuta

This computer was partially compatible with the Texas Instuments TI 99/4A. It had almost the same characteristics, except its main CPU (TMS 9995 instead of the TMS 9900 for the TI 99/4A).

The two languages (GBASIC and Tomy Basic) were only available in UK and US computers. The Japanese computers didn't have the Tomy Basic (a TI-like Basic), but a "nihongo basic" using japanese characters and words, e.g. "kake" meant "print", "moshi-naraba" meant "if-then".

This computer, known under the name Pyuuta in Japan had no really success outside Japan. It was followed by the Pyuuta Mark 2 and a game console called Pyuuta Jr one year later.



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wow!! my father got me this computer when i was a kid!! i love it!!! you can program in BASIC (at the time i have no idea i will work on computers and still program in BASIC some times). it was fun!! you can draw things!!!, but i can not save anything... i never knew why, good to see it again!! thanks dad for the great gift (R.I.P).

          
Wednesday 12th December 2012
byron guerrero (guatemala)

wow!! my father got me this computer when i was a kid!! i love it!!! you can program in BASIC (at the time i have no idea i will work on computers and still program in BASIC some times). it was fun!! you can draw things!!!, but i can not save anything... i never knew why, good to see it again!! thanks dad for the great gift (R.I.P).

          
Wednesday 12th December 2012
byron guerrero (guatemala)

This was my first computer as a kid$-the first computer that belonged entirely to ME. I had a couple of games, the joysticks, the built-in painting program, plus BASIC. But i couldn''t save anything, because we never got the cassette drive. Oh well. Fun stuff :)

          
Wednesday 28th December 2011
Dave (USA)

 

NAME  Tutor / Pyuuta
MANUFACTURER  Tomy
TYPE  Home Computer
ORIGIN  Japan
YEAR  1983
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  GBasic + Tomy Basic on later machines
Integrated software : Tomy Paint (paint program)
KEYBOARD  QWERTY, 56 rubber keys
with a large pink spacebar
CPU  Texas-Instrument TMS 9995NL
SPEED  2.7 MHz
CO-PROCESSOR  Videochip : Texas-Instrument TMS 9918ANL
RAM  16 kb (up to 64 kb)
VRAM  16 kb
ROM  32 kb (including TOMY Basic, GBASIC, and graphic software)
TEXT MODES  32 x 24 in 16 colors
GRAPHIC MODES  256 x 192 in 16 colors
4 unicolor sprites
COLOrsc  16
SOUND  3 channels (2 music, 1 noise), 8 octaves
SIZE / WEIGHT  36 x 24 cm
I/O PORTS  Joystick port (9-pin DSUB, but not Atari compatible)
RF output
Video composite/Audio outputs
I/O port
Cartridge slot
5-DIN plug for tape-recorder
PRICE  £150 (UK, October 1983)
$380 (USA, October 1983)

  
 

I love its pink / purple spacebar key !!

 
  




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