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M > MOS TECHNOLOGY  > KIM 1     


MOS TECHNOLOGY
KIM 1

This prehistoric computer has no "real" keyboard and no video output, program are entered by the small hexadecimal keyboard (located in the lower right part of the picture) and results are displayed on the small LED "screen" (it can display only 6 digits). It has a simple monitor that allows one to examine & modify memory, load and save paper tape, load and save cassette tape, run and debug programs through a 'single step' mode. The monitor works with the built in keypad and LEDs, or a terminal like the Teletype ASR33.

It is possible to connect the KIM to a terminal via a dedicated serial port.

Soon after release, Commodore Business Machines would buy out MOS Technologies and distribute the KIM-1 with a Commodore name on it.

Bob Leedom reports :
The KIM-1 had "no video output", you say? And the "small LED screen...can only display 6 digits"?
Not quite. The software could address each segment of the 7-segment displays in the "LED screen". As a result, tremendous ingenuity was unleashed by the KIM-1 User's Group, and the display was used for many clever things.
The editors published my version of the artificial intelligence board game (in which the computer learns which moves lose, and never makes those moves again, until it's eventually unbeatable), my baseball game (two-player or you vs computer, six kinds of pitches possible, scoreboard, men-on-base display, lots more), and my semi-successful commercial entry called KIM-venture (a tiny version of Adventure, with XYZZY-type secret word, monsters, treasures, 26 rooms, and more).
It was an amazing little computer. Mine still works!


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I incorporated a KIM-1 into USPTO patent $ 4,281,579 - issued in yr 1981. Demonstrated working prototype to US piano mfgs (who didn''t get it) but sold rights Yamaha who sold millions. Still have KIM-1 but will be listing on e-bay this week - Thursday 7/19/2012 . Will be interesting to see what it brings.

          
Sunday 15th July 2012
Tim Bennett

In the early 80s at age 16 I attended a science camp at RPI, and my project was to program a KIM-1 to use Newton's method to find the resonance of a rotating wheel. It was a lecture demo for a physics prof.

I wrote machine code and hand assembled it, then punched it in. After a while you could read the machine code.

          
Friday 6th June 2008
David Honig (USA)

Fond memories of these as I used them in my first real engineering job. Around 1978 we built a motion control system for animation cameras. It used stepping motor control hardware based on 6522s that I designed. The system was used to create motion graphics for TV spots mostly. I still have one with a KIM-3 4K RAM expansion card.

          
Sunday 4th February 2007
Rob urton (Olmsted Falls, Ohio)

 

NAME  KIM 1
MANUFACTURER  MOS Technology
TYPE  Home Computer
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1975
KEYBOARD  Hexadecimal keyboard, calculator type
CPU  6502
SPEED  1 MHz
RAM  1152 bytes
ROM  2 KB (assembler)
TEXT MODES  6 digits LED screen
GRAPHIC MODES  None
COLOrsc  No
SOUND  Various square wave frequencies could be produced by software
SIZE / WEIGHT  Unknown
I/O PORTS  tape interface, bus expansion, serial (to connect to a terminal)
POWER SUPPLY  5V / 1.2A and 12V / 100mA. The 12V was only needed for the serial function
PERIPHERALS  Unknown
PRICE  $250 (USA, 1975)





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