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A > ACORN COMPUTER  > Electron     


Acorn Computer
Electron

The Acorn Electron is basically a cut-down version of the Acorn BBC-B with which it is partly compatible. After the success of the BBC, Acorn and founder Chris Cury wanted a product to compete with "under £200" computers and especially with the Sinclair Spectrum, its main threat. But sadly, Acorn failed to meet the demand for the new system, mainly because of production problems related to the large custom ULA at the heart of the Electron.

The next year (1984), Acorn decided to anticipate all these problems and focused on producing the Electron in vast numbers. But unfortunately, public demand and enthusiasm were on the wane, and despite an extensive £4-million advertising campaign, a third of the Electrons that were built never made it to the shelves, leaving behind large stockpiles of components that had been paid for but were never used.

Compared to the BBC and its flexible connectivity, the Electron was quite basic with only one expansion port to play around with. Fortunately, Acorn quickly released the Plus 1 expansion offering two ROM cartridge slots, a parallel / centronics interface and a joystick connector.

The built-in Acorn Electron BASIC, largely derived from the famous BBC BASIC, was impressive with innovative features such as the ability to define real procedures with DEF PROC and ENDPROC, or the handling of error events (in 1983 !). There was even an OLD statement which would recover a program erased by NEW. A complete assembler language was also stored in the 32K ROM.

The graphics capabilities were also quite impressive for a computer of this category. Text mode of up to 80 columns and a high resolution of up to 640 x 256 pixels with 2 colors. The custom ULA developed especially for the Electron handled the video display, sound and I/O communications! This was the real heart of the Electron.

The mechanical keyboard was very good. BASIC statements were printed on most of the keys, allowing users to type them in one go. A small amber LED placed on the left part of the keyboard indicated if you were in lowercase or uppercase mode.

Despite being more powerful than the ZX Spectrum, the Electron didn't sell well and suffered from a lack of certain software.



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I only now got some Electron Emulators, but in old days did I have an Texas Instrument TI994A. And a Lambda 8300, then a Commodore 64. But I sold them after a while, I am very interested in programming Basic.

          
Sunday 13rd April 2014
Mikael (Sweden)
Welcome To My Homepage

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/08/23/acorn_electron_history_at_30/

          
Saturday 24th August 2013
Anne Bokma (The Netherlands)

I loved this machine. I bought one in 1985 when it got dumped on the market. It costed me fl 100,$ (appr. 45 euro). Bought some games too (Androids!). Later on I bought the Plus 1 and a double-density 5,25" drive! A new world opened up to me. With the RAM extension, you could load programs into the upper memory, like Pascal. And program the RAM with your on boot loaders. I have programmed a lot (VDU codes!). I frequently bought the Electron User magazine, and type the code from the magazine. When I moved to my current house in 2005 I gave the Electron away to a friend.

          
Wednesday 15th May 2013
Marc (The Netherlands)

 

NAME  Electron
MANUFACTURER  Acorn Computer
TYPE  Home Computer
ORIGIN  United Kingdom
YEAR  July 1983
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  Acorn Electron Basic + 6502 assembler
KEYBOARD  QWERTY full-stroke keyboard, 56 keys, basic statements accessible through keys, 10 function keys (0...9 keys + FUNC)
ESCAPE, CAPS LK/FUNC, CTRL,BREAK,COPY,RETURN,DELETE,SHIFT (x2)
CPU  MOS 6502A
SPEED  1 MHz
CO-PROCESSOR  custom ULA
RAM  32 kb
ROM  32 kb
TEXT MODES  20 x 32, 40 x 25, 40 x 32, 80 x 25, 80 x 32
GRAPHIC MODES  160 x 256 (4 or 16 colors), 320 x 256 (2 or 4 colors), 640 x 256 (2 colors)
COLOrsc  8 colors + 8 flashing versions of the same colors
SOUND  1 channel of sound + 1 channel of white sound, 7 octaves. In fact 3 virtual sound channels mapped to the single available physical channel.
Built-in speaker
SIZE / WEIGHT  16 x 34 x 6.5 cm
I/O PORTS  Expansion port, Tape-recorder connector (1200 baud), aerial TV connector (RF modulator), RGB video output
POWER SUPPLY  External PSU, 18v
PRICE  £199 (UK, august 83)
2950 fr (France, february 84)





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