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> SYSTEMS USING CARTRIDGES WITH GI GAMES

When we write GI games, we mean chipsets sold by General Instruments in the 1970s which made the success of many pong systems. In these chipsets were "ready to run" games and pong manufacturers had almost only to put these chipsets into their system cases to make them work !

After the big success encountered by pong systems, people wanted to buy systems with more games than the ones implemented within their console. So manufacturers conceived cartridge systems that they called "Programmable Systems", i.e. consoles accepting different cartridges for "endless" fun... But while some did real research & development to conceive original systems (ex : Atari), most manufacturers made cartridge systems using GI chips, because this was the easiest and cheapest solution.

As these GI chips were first used in "normal" pong systems, collectors often call these systems "cartridge pong systems" though most of the games are not pong games at all... There a lot of different designed systems but they all play the same games...

 

> HOW TO RECOGNISE THEM ?

- The main fact is that there are always 10 buttons to make game selections. This is because most cartridges had a lot of games in them, the maximum being 10 games for the "Sport" games cartridge (AY-3-8610 GI chip).

 

- Joysticks have 1 action button each.

 

- There are usually 4 or 5 switches typical of pong games settings (Power on/off, Speed pro/am, Player 1 difficulty Pro/Am, Player 2 difficulty Pro/Am, Automatic service on/off)

 

- There is also a Start or Reset button (often orange).

 

> THE GAMES

There are a maximum of 8 games which are differently labelled depending on the systems which used them. These games are :

Usual name

Games

GI chip

Supersportic

10 ball games

AY-3-8610

Football basketball tennis hockey grille

Motorcycle

4 motorcycle games

AY-3-8760

Motocycle 1 Motocucle 1 Motorman

Tank Battle

2 tank games

AY-3-8710

Racing cars

2 racing car games

AY-3-8603

Submarine

3 naval battle games

AY-3-8605

Submarine Space

Super wipeout games

10 more ball games

AY-3-8606

Shooting gallery

Shooting games (gun needed)

AY-3-8607

Attack Target skeet

More shooting games ?

...

...

 

> THE SYSTEMS

Name

Brand

Country

 

SD-050

ITMC

France

 

SD-050

Grandstand

UK

 

SD-050

Hanimex

France

 

PP-790

Audiosonic

Netherlands

 

64562

Mark

???

 

Programmable TV Game

Universum

Germany

 

SD-070

Hanimex

France

 

Color TV Game

Acetronic

UK

 

Micro 10

Prinztronic

UK

 

Micro 5500

Prinztronic

UK

 

SHG Blackpoint

SHG

Germany

 

Poppy 9015

Poppy

Germany

 

Sanwa 9015

Sanwa

Germany

 

Unimex

Mark IX

Germany

 

Optim 600

Optim

???

 

Tele Cassetten Game...

Palladium

Germany

 

Tele Cassetten Game...

Palladium

Germany

 

Cablestar

Binatone

UK

 

Programmable game

Grandstand

UK

 

TVG 10

Poppy

Germany

 

Tournament 2000

Prinztronic

UK

 

Telesports 3

Radofin

Japan

 

SHG Blackpoint - Model FS-1003

SHG

Germany

 

Telesports

SHG

Germany

 

Jeu Video Cassette Interchangeable

Univox

France

 

.

 

 



  
       
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