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H > HEWLETT PACKARD  > HP-9810   


Hewlett Packard
HP-9810

The HP-9810 was the successor of the HP-9100. Although it kept software compatibility, its internal hardware organisation was completely different. The core memory was replaced with volatile MOS RAM chips and the display used the new technology of 7-segment light emitting diodes (LED) instead of cathode-ray tube.

Arithmetic routines were stored in ROM and user programs in RAM. Several RAM extensions, specialized ROM modules and peripherals (paper tape reader/puncher, line printer, measuring instruments) could be connected to the basic model.

The standard version of this calculator included a magnetic card reader located directly behind the two yellow keys at the top-right in the keyboard. While a thermal printer was available as an option, it could only print numeric characters unless you had the Alphanumeric Printer ROM. The add-on ROMs for this machine came in the form of a block that plugged into the left side of the keyboard; each had its own specialized keys. You can see the edges of the ROM block in the picture; the 3x5 array of keys at the leftmost area of the keyboard is its top. It was common to have more than one ROM extension available in a single block, since you could only plug in one at a time.

With this first generation of programmable calculators, engineers eventually became independant from main frames and computer centers. They could write programs, save, recall and print them off-line; and even easily carry the computer from a place to another... it was a true revolution at the time.

We need more info about this computer ! If you designed, used, or have more info about this system, please send us pictures or anything you might find useful.

 

Our school had one of those in 1979 (including a A4-flatbed-plotter), but everyone wanted to use the newer PET 2001 and CBM 3002 systems. so I had that machine pretty much for myself.

          
Saturday 5th March 2016
bb

I have in my lab one of the Hp 9845b i believe without monitors.If want to get picture of the machine tell me.

          
Tuesday 4th November 2003
Achim Alexandru (Romania)

 

NAME  HP-9810
MANUFACTURER  Hewlett Packard
TYPE  Professional Computer
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1971
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  RPN (Reverse Polish Notation) based
KEYBOARD  75 keys in 3 parts
CPU  Serial 16-bit
SPEED  Unknown
RAM  51 registers and 500 program steps
ROM  Unknown
TEXT MODES  3 lines of 15 numeric chars. Each line displays one register
GRAPHIC MODES  None
SIZE / WEIGHT  49,5 (W) x 40,6 (D) x 17,8 (H) cm / 15.4 Kg
I/O PORTS  Unknown
POWER SUPPLY  Built-in power supply unit
PERIPHERALS  RAM and ROM modules, Peripherals I/O connector
PRICE  $2475




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