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S > SAGE COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY > Sage IV   


Sage Computer Technology
Sage IV

The Sage IV was a no-compromise extended version of the Sage II.

There were 2 large PC boards in a SAGE IV. The first had the CPU, 2 serial ports, PIO, GPIB, floppy controller, up to 512K DRAM. This board was the same as the main board in the SAGE II. The second board (which set above the first) had 4 more serial ports, hard disk controller, and another 512K DRAM.

The case was slightly taller as it contained the full height hard disk.

The built-in multi-user BIOS, written by Bill Bonham the Sage software guru, allowed the Sage to run several operating systems at once, serving up to 6 serial ports in real time within 1 MB of RAM... in 1983. At this time, PC/Intel based systems used a 8 bit-bus processor running twice slower, and a primitive operating system. So why this Sage system didn't become the standard of the future?

In addition to the P-System delivered with the system, several companies in the world wrote various operating systems (CP/M, Posix, PDos, Tripos, Pluto...) and languages (Fortran, Lisp, Pascal...) for the Sage IV.

Although Sage systems were the fastest personal systems of their days, and were intensively used by scientists and engineers for more than ten years, they are now totally forgotten, and so are all their powerful related OS's and software.

_______________________

G. Lobay remembers:
Our lab had the Sage II and IV. This company changed its name to Stride Computer and continued operations under that name for a while.
There were more models produced under the Stride name with the same basic architecture - P-system O/S, Motorola processor, dumb terminals. Our lab also had at least two Stride machines. Of course now they are long gone.


More information from Birger Blixt, from Sweden:
I worked for a company that sold stride computers in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, and I think, there was nothing more stable in the micro computer range at the time. In Denmark they controlled wind craft generators and was running over 10 years with zero admin, and maybe even zero reboot.
I was one of very few in Sweden that could operate them and partition the hard-drive for unix (UniStride) for the Stride 440, 460. I also repaired the 400,600 series, so Stride Computers sent me all drawings and pal source.
Later they came with SCSI, and the need for PSYS was removed. (stride 640 ,660). The last model in the serie was Stride 740 also sold as SuperStride 740 and Shannon 5000. (I even think they was named Millenium a short period). The 740 model had 48 serial ports, and could easy handle all of them at the same time with 20-30 Office users logged in, a room full of printers that run constantly and so on.
One company in Sweden still use one superstride 740 in production, and I support it for them.
My first unix machine was a stride 440 , so it's very nostalgic things for me.


We need more info about this computer ! If you designed, used, or have more info about this system, please send us pictures or anything you might find useful.

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Doctor Smith says: Cackling Cacophony! Very fast over priced junk. I prefer Apple II anyday over this Bubble-headed Booby. Version 4

          
Friday 3rd February 2017
Doctor Smith says: Cackling Cacophony!

took some pictures of my Stride 460 a while ago http://imgur.com/a/jxZtB$0 tape drive´s dead though and the winchester discs have seen better days, so running or reinstalling Unistride is not possible at the moment. pSystem on floppy works fine though.

          
Thursday 14th February 2013
Jonas Glanshed (Sweden)

I learnt programming many years ago on a Sage IV. I have been a programmer for years and I still think the ucsd Pascal embedded in the Sage IV was the best language I ever used.
I loved the Sage even if it did have a tendency to break down quite a lot! We used it for transmitting programs to 4 welding robots. It was connected to an external box which allowed it to produce colour graphics on one of those steel cased monitors you used to see on BBC Micro''s.
I once wrote a robotics simulation which used the colour screen. It simulated the 4 robots and I had an outline of the machinery on the screen too. Really powerful piece of kit for its time - early to mid eighties.

          
Saturday 15th October 2011
Rich Austin (Barnsley, England)
richardjaustin.co.uk

 

NAME  Sage IV
MANUFACTURER  Sage Computer Technology
TYPE  Professional Computer
ORIGIN  U.S.A.
YEAR  1983
BUILT IN LANGUAGE  None
KEYBOARD  Serial video terminal
CPU  Motorola MC-68000
SPEED  8 Mhz.
RAM  1 MB
ROM  Unknown
TEXT MODES  80 columns x 25 lines
GRAPHIC MODES  None
COLORS  None
SIZE / WEIGHT  Unknown
I/O PORTS  6 x Serial - 1 x Parallel - 1 x GPIB
BUILT IN MEDIA  1 x 5.25'' 800 KB F.D. drives - 1 x 5 to 40 MB Winchester hard-disk
OS  USCD P-System - CP/M 68K
POWER SUPPLY  Buit-in power supply unit
PRICE  Unknown


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